Anthony Archibald - Guitar - Guitar: Green Door (Including lyrics and chords)"Green Door" is a song that popped into my head a couple of nights ago, and as I have never sung it before, I decided to have a go.Wikipedia has the following about it:"The Green Door" (or "Green Door") is a 1956 popular song with music composed by Bob "Hutch" Davie and lyrics written by Marvin Moore. The song was first recorded by Jim Lowe, whose version reached number one on the US pop chart. The hit version of the song in the United States was recorded by Jim Lowe, backed by the orchestra of songwriter Davie, with Davie also playing piano, and by the vocal group the High Fives. The track was arranged by Davie, who added thumbtacks to the hammers of his piano and sped up the tape to give a honky-tonk sound.[1] Released by Dot Records, the single reached #1 on the Billboard charts for one week on November 17, 1956, replacing "Love Me Tender" by Elvis Presley.In the United Kingdom, Lowe's version reached #8 on the charts, but a version by Frankie Vaughan was even more popular, reaching #2. Another UK recording, by Glen Mason, reached #24 on the UK chart. The most popular British version was by rock and roll revivalist Shakin' Stevens which spent four weeks at number one in August 1981.
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Guitar: Green Door (Including lyrics and chords)"Green Door" is a song that popped into my head a couple of nights ago, and as I have never sung it before, I decided to have a go.Wikipedia has the following about it:"The Green Door" (or "Green Door") is a 1956 popular song with music composed by Bob "Hutch" Davie and lyrics written by Marvin Moore. The song was first recorded by Jim Lowe, whose version reached number one on the US pop chart. The hit version of the song in the United States was recorded by Jim Lowe, backed by the orchestra of songwriter Davie, with Davie also playing piano, and by the vocal group the High Fives. The track was arranged by Davie, who added thumbtacks to the hammers of his piano and sped up the tape to give a honky-tonk sound.[1] Released by Dot Records, the single reached #1 on the Billboard charts for one week on November 17, 1956, replacing "Love Me Tender" by Elvis Presley.In the United Kingdom, Lowe's version reached #8 on the charts, but a version by Frankie Vaughan was even more popular, reaching #2. Another UK recording, by Glen Mason, reached #24 on the UK chart. The most popular British version was by rock and roll revivalist Shakin' Stevens which spent four weeks at number one in August 1981.
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Guitar: Turpin Hero (Including lyrics and chords) Turpin Hero is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". I uploaded a version of this song ten years ago using my 12-string guitar for accompaniment. The equipment I was using at that time was a simple webcam, the microphone of which was prone to interference if I sang too loud, so I am uploading a new version today using my 6-string guitar. Dick Turpin was a notorious highwayman whose exploits were romanticized after he was hung for horse theft in York in 1739. Despite the title of this song, he was no hero.
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Autoharp: Things (Including lyrics and chords) The theme we have set for song performances at this month's meeting of the Manx Autoharpers Group is "Objects or Artifacts". An alternative title for this theme to me could be "Things", and that is the song I will be performing at tomorrow's meeting. It is a song written and recorded by Bobby Darin in 1962 and has been covered by many artists since including one of my favourite version by Dean Martin and Nancy Sinatra. Now that I have published the video, I have only just noticed that in the annotations, I missed the letter "e" from the end of the word "ride " in the choruses written without chords.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Autoharp: Sweet Rose of Sharon (The) (Including lyrics and chords) For the UK Autoharp group on Facebook, Jan has set a theme of Flowers for this month's challenge, so I am submitting my own composition, "The Sweet Rose of Sharon" as my offering. I wrote this song for my flautist friend, Sharon Christian, and have previously performed it playing my guitar with her playing the instrumental break on her flute. Three years ago at the Scottish Autoharp Workshop Weekend in Moniaive in Scotland, Bob Ebdon was kind enough to accompany me on his autoharp while I played the song on my guitar. Yesterday, for the first time, I decided to try it out on my own autoharp, this being the result.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Till Tomorrow Goes Away (Including lyrics and chords) Another request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, is for a song I have not heard before by an artist I have not heard of. The song is "Till Tomorrow Goes Away" which has been written by Max Clarke who according to Wikipedia is known by his stage name Cut Worms, and is a singer, songwriter, and musician hailing from Ohio who is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. Cut Worms has opened for bands such as Jenny Lewis, Kevin Morby, The Lemon Twigs and Michael Rault. Cut Worms released the EP Alien Sunset in 2017. For my interpretation of the song, in the annotations, G* is played using only the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings and hammering on the 4th string behind the 2nd fret: T4(h), I, M, T4(h), T4(h), T4(h),
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Queen of Connemara (The) (Including lyrics and chords) "The Queen of Connemara" is a song requested by my America friend Ken Shuittlesworth. Written by Frank Fahy, it was one of the songs from the repertoire of the Irish folk duo, Clancy and Makem. Liam Clancy and Tommy Makem were two of the very successful group The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem who paired up after the other brothers retired, though they did get together from time to time for reunion tours in the mid 1980's. The Queen of Connemara in this case was not a person, but a boat. A "hooker" in this context is a fishing boat that caught fish using a long line with hooks unlike a "trawler" which caught fish in a large net.
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Anthony Archibald - 5-string banjo
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Guitar: Unfortunate Tailor (The) (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" this morming comes with the following footnote information; Source: Kennedy, D (1987) Martin Carthy: A Guitar in Folk Music. Petersham, New Punchbowl Music Notes: A version of this song - with a significantly different verse order - is in the Gardiner collection, Gardiner H.456/H.935 and was collected from George Lovett, Winchester, Hants August 1906 and from Alfred Oliver, Basingstoke, Hants September 1907. As with most of the songs from this set of pamphlets, I have worked out my own chord progression for it.
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Guitar: Tramping Song (Including lyrics and chords) According to the BBC pamphlet from the 1971 issue of the programme "Singing Together", this is an Irish Song: From "The Song Fair" published by J Curwen & Sons Ltd. It is a very appropriate song for me as with a group called the Manx Footpaths Conservation Group, I do a lot a walking and especially at this time of the year, the hills are covered with flowering gorse and heather and in places deep bracken. To get the quick chord changes for the last line of each verse, G, Am,, G, Am I do not play a full G chord, but simply leave all the strings open and hold the Am chord shape, dropping the fingers down for that chord and lifting them off for the G chord.
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Guitar: On Board of a Man-of-War (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is also known as "Susans's Adventures inf a Man-of-War". A footnote in the pamphlet reads: Frank Kidson, Traditional Tunes, 1891, pp. 102-3 (Reprinted Llanerch Press, 1999) Kidson noted: "This is another East Riding tune, which, with the words, is much thought of among the seafaring classes round about Hull. The incident of a girl going to sea disguised in sailor's attire during the last century's naval wars was really not an uncommon one; there are many such recorded. Considering the hard life and the tyranny to which the sailors of that period were subjected, it is a scarcely to be conceived impulse which would force a girl to such a proceeding. "In the present ballad the line- "She faced the walls of China, where her life was not insured "is a highly poetical flight on the part of the poet, and would be doubtlessly well appreciated by the audience it was intended for." As with most of the songs from this series, I have devised my own chord progression.
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2019 August walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of August. The weather this month has been mixed, but we did not lose any walks despite there being low cloud, mist and rain on two occasions. I did however miss two walks when I was off the island attending an Autoharp Workshop Weekend in Moniaive in Scotland. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: Flanagan – Autoharp San Francisco Blues – Guitar Route 66 – Guitar Sacramento – Guitar If I Were a Blackbird – Guitar Spotted Cow – Guitar Whistle Daughter Whistle – Guitar Green Grow the Rashes O – Autoharp The Shepherd and His Dog – Guitar If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp/guitar
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Guitar: Spotted Cow (The) (Including lyrics and chords) I am often amazed by the risqué content of some of the songs that were published in the BBC schools' programme, "Singing Together". The Spotted Cow is one such, though there are more that are even more obvious in their sexual content. The footnotes in the pamphlet are as follows: Source: Purslow, F, (1968), The Wanton Seed, EDFS, London Notes: Frank Purslow wrote: Tune and text from Amos Ash of Combe Florey, Somerset. Hammond S.4. Another example of the idyllic rural (but town-made) song - by so many people still thought to be typical of folk-song, breathing the sweet unpolluted air of scented flowery dells, full of innocence and purity. All the same, I'm not sure that "the spotted cow," especially at the end of the song, is everything it appears to be. Chiefly found in tradition in England, where it persists to the present day, and widely printed on broadsides during the 19th century. Baring Gould (Songs of the West) states that "The earliest form of the words is found in a garland printed by Angus of Newcastle, B.M. (11,621,c.4)". Angus was active between around 1774 and 1825. As with all the songs from the "Singing Together" pamphlets, I have worked out my own chord progression for this one.
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Guitar: Silly Old Man (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to the BBC programme, Singing Together, for my upload. The following comes from the footnote in the pamphlet: Source: Songs of the West by S. Baring-Gould. Notes: Abridged from S. Baring-Gould. A ballad that was sung by the late Rev. G. Luscombe something over half a century ago. He was curate at Bickleigh, and by ancestry belonged to a good old Devonshire family, he was paticularly fond of ancient West of England songs. Miss Mason in her 'Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs,' 1877, gives a slight variant. The ballad is in Dixon's 'Songs of the English Peasantry,' 1846, as taken down from him in Yorkshire in 1845. In Yorkshire the song goes by the name of 'Saddle to Rags'; there and elsewhere in Northern England, it is sung to the tune of 'The Rant,' better known as 'How happy I could be with either.' It has been published as a Scottish Ballad in Maidment's 'Ballads and Songs,' Edinburgh, 1859. It is given in Kidson's 'Traditional Tunes.' The words also are in 'A Pedlar's Pack,' by Logan, Edinburgh, 1849. The tune to which the ballad is sung in Devonshire is quite distinct. As with other songs from this series, I have worked out my own chord progression for the song. In the third line, there is a quick change from C to D which I have performed by simply sliding the C chord shape up two frets (indicated by a right pointing arrow) rather than changing to the normal open D position.
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Anthony Archibald - 5-string banjo
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Guitar: If I Were a Blackbird (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by subscriber Nima Pourkarimi, "If I Were a Blackbird" is an old song covered by many artists, the version I have based my performance on being "Silly Wizard". Although the title of the song is more grammatically correct, the same line in the chorus is sung as: "If I was a blackbird". The song is new to me, so this is the first time I have sung it and as yet have not done so in front of an audience.
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Guitar: Hal-An-Tow (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am catching up with songs that have been requested by subscribers. Ha-An-Tow is one such, requested by Johnny Oldham. It is a Cornish traditional song, performed on 8th May in Helston, Cornwall, in a pageant celebrating the end of Winter and start of Summer. The song contains disparaging references to the Spaniards, probably referring to the Spanish raid on Newlyn in 1595. There are probably many more verses, but I have based my own interpretation on a version recorded by The Watersons, and have worked out my own chord progression for it. Although my maternal great-grandparents came to the Isle of Man from Cornwall, I have never visited that county, and this song is new to me.
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Autoharp: Spider in the Bath (Including lyrics and chords) At the monthly meeting of the Manx Autoharpers last week, we had a theme of "insects and/or creepy-crawlies". I chose this one which I have done previously using my guitar for accompaniment. On the morning on which I recorded this autoharp version, there was in fact a spider in my bath, so I took a couple of photos of it before helping it out and releasing it. There is a BBC children's television series by this name which has its own theme song, but this is not it. This one is a song written by Marcus Turner from New Zealand.
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Guitar: Shuttle Rins (The) (Including lyrics and chords) My song from BBC programme "Singing Together" today is simply identified as "Scotland" in the pamphlet. In an article under the title "Discussion" in Mudcat, Malcolm Douglas wrote: The song is originally from Henry Symes's book Poems and Songs Chiefly for the Encouragement of the Working Classes (1849). The Shuttle Rins appeared in Norman Buchan and Peter Hall, The Scottish Folksinger (1973) and has subsequently been recorded by various people, including Gordeanna McCulloch. The tune is one of those associated with the older song The Boatie Rows. Whether that tune was intended for it by Symes, or whether it was added by Buchan and Hall, I don't know. The dialect of the Buchan-Hall text is rather ironed out in Singing Together, and lacks several verses. See Mudcat thread Lyr Req: the shuttle runs Not really a traditional song (though perhaps assumed to be by 1984), so not listed in Roud. It being a Scottish song, I have pronounced "bread" as "bried". A pirn is a rod onto which weft thread is wound for use in weaving. A "sark" is a shirt.
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Guitar: Shepherd and his Dog (The) (Including lyrics and chords) The footnote in the BBC pamphlet of the Singing Together programme from Spring 1959 has the following about the song: Welsh Traditional Tune 'Twll Bach y Clo' Words by Barbara Kluge This tune is very widespread and is probably best known - outside Wales! - for the Australian song "Click go the Shears", a song I uploaded nine years ago: https://youtu.be/LvAZGGFtu6k The pamphlet attributes the melody as a Welsh traditional tune, but Wikipedia claims it is an American Civil War song, "Ring the Bell, Watchman", by Henry Clay Work, author of "My Grandfather's Clock". Another song that uses this tune is "Strike the Bell" which I also uploaded using my mandolin for accompaniment: https://youtu.be/f8OXNc_Mw_E
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The Seeds of Love (Including lyrics and chords) Today's upload from the BBC programme "Singining Together" comes from the Cecil Sharp collection and according to the footnote in the pamphlet, had an interesting history; Noted by Cecil Sharp from John England of Hambridge, Somerset, in 1903. Although this is not an uncommon song and is available in many other places, it represents a seminal event in the first Folk Song Revival; Cecil Sharp's introduction to folksong "in the wild". Sharp was staying with the vicar of Hambridge, Charles Marson, an old friend from their days in Australia. Maud Karpeles (Cecil Sharp: His Life and Work, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1967) tells the story thus: "Cecil Sharp was sitting in the vicarage garden talking to Charles Marson and to Mattie Kay, who was likewise staying at Hambridge, when he heard John England quietly singing to himself as he mowed the vicarage lawn. Cecil Sharp whipped out his notebook and took down the tune; and then persuaded John to give him the words. He immediately harmonised the song; and that same evening it was sung at a choir supper by Mattie Kay, Cecil Sharp accompanying. The audience was delighted; as one said, it was the first time that the song had been put into evening dress." The song has been widespread in England in various forms and under many different names, also turning up in the USA and Scotland. William Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time, 1859), names it, along with Cupid's Garden and Early One Morning, as "one of the three most popular songs among the servant-maids of the present generation", and mentions its appearance on the London stage, sung by Mrs. Honey, in a play entitled The Loan of a Lover. He also quotes a passage from Whittaker's History of the Parish of Whalley (1801) which ascribes the lyric to a Mrs. Fleetwood Habergham, of Habergham Hall, Lancashire, who is supposed to have written the song to console herself when, in 1689, her husband's extravagances finally led to the loss of the family's estates. This apocryphal story is not generally taken too seriously nowadays. I noticed that when I recorded the song, I made a couple of slight errors in the lyrics. The annotations give the correct version.
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Guitar: Whistle Daughter Whistle (Including lyrics and chords) "Whistle Daughter Whistle" is an old folk song that appears on an album called " Folk Songs of Courting and Complaint " performed by Peggy Seeger. I was not aware of this song until last weekend when my friend Beastie Dovey sang it at a jam session in the Craigdarragh Hotel in Moniaive where we were attending an autoharp workshop weekend. Beastie cannot whistle, so she asked me to help her by doing the whistle for her. Unable to find the chords on the internet, I have devised my own which I think fit the song well enough.
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Guitar: Sacramento (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is a sea shanty with the title "Sacramento". According to the footnote in the pamphlet: The song dates from the year 1849 when gold was discovered in Sacramento, California. The men who took part in this rush were called 'forty-niners', an expression which occurs in another folk song of this period, Clementine. In common with other sea shanties, the song would have been led by a "shantyman" with his crewmates singing the repeated line "Sacramento, Sacramento" and probably the whole of the chorus. This is only a short song, but no doubt could be lengthened by the "Shantyman" when necessary. As with all the tunes in the programme, the sheet music is available, but does not give the chords which I have worked out for myself.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Sad Song Palace Grand (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for my upload. As it happens, I saw a thread on Mudcat yesterday regarding this very song. The BBC pamphlet has the following about it: Source: Randolph, V, 1982. Ozark Folksongs, Illinois Press, Urbana Notes: Collected by Vance Randolph from May Kennedy McCord, Springfield, Mo., May 14, 1934, who learnt it near Galena, Mo., about 1900. Randolph wrote that "this piece has no local title but Carl Sandburg, who heard it at Springfield Mo., in 1930, always called it 'The Sad Song'" Norm Cohen wrote: The origins of this song have not been traced, but it would appear to be a sheet-music composition of the 1880s or 1890s. Evelyn Beers learned it from May Kennedy McCord and has sung it frequently; her version is in Bush (1970). Joan Baez also recorded the piece; she learned it from Randolph's text. When Randolph recorded Mrs McCord singing this in 1941, (AFS 5297 B3), she titled it "Lady Mary". Max Hunter, who also recorded her rendition of the song (MFH 549), used the title by which his mother had sung it - "Palace Grand." I may be wrong, but the melody sounds to me to be very much like "South Wind".
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: San Francisco Bay Blues (Including lyrics and chords) San Francisco Bay Blues was written/composed by Jesse Fuller, an American "one-man-band" musician, the song being recorded in 1954 and released a year later on a small label called "World Song". It soon became a classic with covers recorded by such artistst as: The Blues Band, Paul Jones, Jim Croce, The Weavers, Sammy Walker, The Brothers Four, Paul Clayton, Richie Havens, Eric Clapton, The Flatlanders, Paul McCartney, Hot Tuna, Janis Joplin, John Lennon, Peter, Paul, and Mary, Mungo Jerry, Glenn Yarbrough, George Ellias, Phoebe Snow, The Wave Pictures, The Halifax III and Eva Cassidy according to Wikipedia. I have never sung it before, largely because I hadn't the courage nor ability to play it on the guitar. Today, I thought I would try it using a kazoo for an instrumental break which Fuller himself used to do and experimenting on how to get the step down from C through B and Bb to A which I have done by barring the strings at the 5th fret (relative to the capo) then sliding down one fret at a time to the second fret. It seemed to work well enough for me I think. I got a little bit tongue-tied at the end, but wasn't going to try to re-record the whole song, so have left it as is. I also speeded up throughout the song, as I am prone to do, even though I set out with good intention of trying to keep the tempo slow.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/kazoo
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Guitar: Route 66 (Including lyrics and chords) My Canadian friend Steve Lacey did a version of this song which he posted on Facebook a couple of weeks go and as I have never sung it before, I decided I would have a go. Here then is my interpretation of "Route 66" described on Wikipedia as follows: "(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66" is a popular rhythm and blues standard, composed in 1946 by American songwriter Bobby Troup. The song uses a twelve-bar blues arrangement and the lyrics follow the path of U.S. Route 66 (US 66), which traversed the western two-thirds of the U.S. from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California. Nat King Cole, with the King Cole Trio, first recorded the song the same year and it became a hit, appearing on Billboard magazine's R&B and pop charts. Another version to reach the Billboard charts was that recorded by Bing Crosby with the Andrews Sisters on May 11, 1946 and this reached the No. 14 position in 1946. The song was subsequently recorded by many artists including Chuck Berry, Glenn Frey, the Rolling Stones, Them, Dr. Feelgood, Asleep at the Wheel, the Manhattan Transfer, Depeche Mode, The Brian Setzer Orchestra, Pappo, The Cramps, John Mayer,, George Benson and Peter Tork & Shoe Suede Blues. I will be away from my computer for five days, so I will not be uploading any more songs until Tuesday of next week.
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Autoharp: Green Grow the Rashes O (Including lyrics and chords) The widow of my good friend Ian Blacklaw Richardson (Max to his friends) requested that I sing this one which Ian used to sing often. I did a twelve-string gutiar accompanied version some time ago, but thought it might sound quite good on the autoharp, so for Elizabeth here is "Green Grow the Rashes O" (There is another song called "Green Grow the Rushes-Oh" which I have also sung, but that one is an English song and should not be confused with this one written by Robert Burns in 1783 and published in Poems in 1787. Later in 1787 it was published with music in The Scots Musical Museum, the first of Burns' poems to be set to music.)
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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2019 July walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of July. The weather this month has been fine for the most part, but we did lose one walk at the very end due to heavy rain and strong winds. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: With My Little Stick of Blackpool Rock – Guitar Flowers in the Valley – Guitar The Mass Rock in the Glen – Guitar Oats and Beans and Barley Grow – Guitar My Master’s Call – Guitar Green Eyes – Guitar Daisy Bell – Autoharp The Rout it has come for the Blues – Guitar Sweet Marie (Original) – Guitar Green Door – Autoharp The Road to the Isles – Guitar We Got Paid by Cash – Guitar Frankie and Johnny – Guitar (Open G tuning) If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/autoharp
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Autoharp: Flanagan (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge for this month on the UK Autoharp Facebook page is Sun, Sea and Holidays, so I thought this one fits well with "Holidays". It is a song that has personal connections for me. Florrie Forde, (real name Flora May Augusta Flannagan) who made this song famous, entertained here in the Isle of Man for over thirty years at the beginning of the last century. She was staying at a hotel in Douglas where she befriended my maternal grandparents and acted as one of my mum's godmothers.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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Guitar: Frankie and Johnny (Including lyrics and chords) A bit of self-indulgence today. I have uploaded a version of this song previously using normal tuning EADGBE. I also uploaded another song, Frankie and Albert, which is an earlier version of the same story which I did using open G tuning DGDGBD. I have chosen to do this one in open G tuning, but am playing the accompaniment in a different way to that which I used for Frankie and Albert, and just getting in the flow. The chords shown in the annotations are chords for strumming an accompniment.
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Guitar: Sweet Marie (Original) (Including lyrics and chords) The original song "Sweet Marie" was written by Philip Parris Lynott and William Scott Gorham. I uploaded Percy French's parody on this song a couple of days ago, not at that time knowing the original song. I have since found the orginal song's lyrics and present the song here. I found the lyrics on a site called "Lyrics.com", but although there are videos on YouTube of him playing the song, they are only instrumentals done in a "bluegrass" style. I did find an old scratchy 78 version by Ada Jones, but it was too indistinct to hear it properly. Irene Dunn and William Powell sang a few lines of the song in the film "Life with Father". Here then is my interpretation of the song for which once again, I have made up my own chord progression.
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Guitar: Sweet Marie (Including lyrics and chords) "Sweet Marie" is a request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth. It is a parody written by that prolific Irish songwriter Percy French on a love song of the same name. Some of French's lyrics paraphrase the original ones. Hank Snow recorded a version of the original song and I will have a go at that one soon.
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Guitar: Rout it is come for the Blues (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme Singing Together is "The Rout it is come for the Blues". As the footnote in the pamphlet says: The title illustrates an interesting example of two English words which now have the same spelling but completely different meanings and origins. Rout meaning disorganised flight etc, comes from Middle English from Old French route. Rout as in this song, meaning muster, or fetch out of hiding, derives from root from O.E. "rµt." The chords I have worked out for myself.
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Guitar: Road to the Isles (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme Singing Together is Road to the Isles. The footnote in the pamphlet from Spring 1975 gives the following informatino about the song: The song was written Kenneth MacLeod. It appeared in his book The Road to the Isles (Edinburgh: Grant & Murray, 1927), with the comment "Written for the lads in France during the Great War." The poem was set by Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser, and was first printed (perhaps worded slightly differently) in Songs of the Hebrides vol II, 1917. According to The Fiddler's Companion, the tune was written as "The Burning Sands of Egypt by John McClellan, D.C.M., a poet and painter from Dunoon, Scotland, who was Pipe Major of the 8th Battalion, Argyl and Sutherland Highlanders, during World War I." Somewhere along the way it apparently also picked up the name The Bens of Jura along with the title it acquired from MacLeod's poem. The Far Coolins (Cuillins) are the mountains of Skye.
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Guitar: The Old Turf Fire (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme "Singing Together" today for a short Irish song about which the footnote in the pamphlet of Spring 1976 read: Roud 8215, one example only at present: Hughes, Irish Country Songs 4, 1936, 41-44. Probably the original source of this text, though the song was recorded by John McCormack and other lyric tenors and was no doubt published as sheet music on the strength of that. The following comes from a site called Mainly Norfolk: English and Other Good Music: Steeleye Span recorded this song for their album Horkstow Grange. It was later included in the Park Records sampler A Stroll Through the Park. Gay Woods commented in the original album's sleeve notes: I used to hear this song when I was a child. “The hearth swept clean” - domestic bliss, my mother's pride and joy. I live near the boglands in the midlands of Ireland now and burn the stuff. There is a spirit and an art in the burning and storing of turf that warms and inspired: “Confounds all reckoning by sun Or star as turf-smoke drifts, Blue bitterness at dusk, and cabins Kneel in clusters to the dark.” (Norman Dugdale, an Englishman who lived in Ireland for nearly 50 years) The chords I am using for accompaniment are of my own devising.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Green Door (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge on UK Autoharps for July was "colours". I have uploaded this song accompanied on my guitar, but decided to give it a go on the autoharp for this challenge. Only four chords needed which for me are: F; F7; Bb; and C7. "Green Door" was written by Bob “Hutch” Davie and Marvin Moore. It was recorded by Jim Lowe in 1956 in USA, and by Frankie Vaughan in the UK and re-recorded by Shakin’ Stevens in 1981. I have based my interpretation on the Frankie Vaughan version which is the first one I remember hearing back in the days of "steam radio", or "wireless". :-)
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
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Guitar: Oats and Beans and Barley Grow (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today according to Wikipedia: "Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow" (normally sung as "Oats And Beans and Barley Grow") is a traditional British and American folk song, 1380 in the Roud Folk Song Index. The tune itself normally used goes by the name "Baltimore" and appears in Joshua Cushing's book "The Fifer's Companion" (1790). According to Alice Bertha Gomme's book "The Traditional Games of England, Scotland and Ireland" (1894), this is a "play song", in which children perform actions with the song, standing in a ring. In "Notes and Queries" 7th series, number xii (c 1870) it is discussed, but the Columbia State University website claims that the earliest known version of the words is dated 1898 (Gomme). I have no recollection of ever playing the game that goes with the song, nor even hearing the song before I found it in Joe Offer's collection of Songs from Singing Together. The melody I picked up from the midi on that site, but the chords are of my own devising. With hindsight, it might have been better to have sung this one in a higher key, perhaps E or F.
Received lots of comments & props
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3,946  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Flowers in the Valley (Including lyrics and chords) Back to songs from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today for a song I have uploaded previously, but on that occasion I sang it from memory and did not get the timing right according to the sheet music I found in Joe Offer's collection of songs from Singing Together. Consequently, I have done it again, this time following the music score.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: We Got Paid by Cash (Including lyrics and chords) One of my American pen friend, Tammy Statler's favourite artists was Johnny Cash. She put her surname and Johnny Cash into her search engine and came up with this song performed by The Statler Brothers. They step up the key of each verse, but I am not skilled enough on the guitar to be able to do this, so I have kept to the key of C throughout. When I came to put in the annotations, I realised that I had sung the first line incorrectly. The annotations are correct and are what I should have sung . This song was written by "The Statlers" as a tribute to Johnny Cash with whom they had a long association as explained in Wikipedia: The Statler Brothers (sometimes simply referred to The Statlers) were an American country music, gospel, and vocal group. The quartet was formed in 1955 performing locally and, in 1964, they began singing backup for Johnny Cash until 1972. Originally performing gospel music at local churches, the group billed themselves as The Four Star Quartet, and later The Kingsmen. In 1963, when the song "Louie, Louie" by the garage rock band also called The Kingsmen became famous, the group elected to bill themselves as The Statler Brothers. Despite the name, only two members of the group (Don and Harold Reid) are actual brothers and none has the surname of Statler. The band, in fact, named themselves after a brand of facial tissue they had noticed in a hotel room (they joked that they could have turned out to be the Kleenex Brothers). Don Reid sang lead; Harold Reid, Don's older brother, sang bass; Phil Balsley sang baritone; and Lew DeWitt sang tenor and was the guitarist of the Statlers before being replaced by Jimmy Fortune in 1983 due to DeWitt's ill health. DeWitt continued to perform as a solo artist until his death on August 15, 1990, from heart and kidney disease.
Received lots of comments & props
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1,432  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Mass Rock in the Glen (Including lyrics and chords) "Mass Rock in the Glen" is a request from my American friend Ken Shuttlesworth. Wikipedia has the following regarding Mass Rocks: Following the religious strife of the seventeenth century and the passing of penal laws in 1695, celebrating Catholic mass in Ireland became a dangerous practice for priest and congregation. Isolated and secluded sites were selected for worship, and natural rocks and boulders often came to be used as an altar or Mass rock. It is often through local knowledge that their locations are still identifiable. The practice of celebrating mass in such fashion was in decline by the middle of the eighteenth century, when many Catholics worshipped in thatched 'mass-houses'. I have chosen to play this one using chord shapes for the key of G, but have put the capo at the 5th fret, so I am really playing and singing in the key of C. The reason for doing it this way is purely personal as I found it easier to pick out snippets of melody in my strumming this way rather than using chords shapes for the key of C.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Daisy Bell (Including lyrics and chords) The theme for the July meeting of the Manx Autoharpers is "Names", so I have chosen to sing this one about "Daisy". Like so many songs from the music hall era, the chorus of this one is very well known, but the verses, less so. It was written by Harry Dacre in 1892. According to Wikipedia: When Dacre, an English popular composer, first came to the United States, he brought with him a bicycle, for which he was charged import duty. His friend William Jerome, another songwriter, remarked lightly: "It's lucky you didn't bring a bicycle built for two, otherwise you'd have to pay double duty." Dacre was so taken with the phrase "bicycle built for two" that he soon used it in a song. That song, Daisy Bell, first became successful in a London music hall, in a performance by Katie Lawrence. Tony Pastor was the first to sing it in the United States. Its success in America began when Jennie Lindsay brought down the house with it at the Atlantic Gardens on the Bowery early in 1892. The song was originally recorded and released by Dan W. Quinn in 1893.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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2019 June walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of June. The weather this month has been mixed as is often the case. At the beginning of the month, damp and misty weather caused havoc with the TT races and for the first time ever, there were practice races held on the first Sunday of the month which is traditionally “Mad Sunday”. This put a lot of walkers off from joining in the walk on that day. Most of the walks throughout the month however were undertaken in fine weather, and all walks went ahead as scheduled. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: Baby Pipes – MuseScore created Violin – My own composition It’s Magic – Guitar La Pique – Guitar Mountain Duel – Guitar The Leprehaun – Guitar Riding in the TT Races – Guitar The Oak and the Ash – Guitar My Bonny Cuckoo – Guitar Linstead Market – Guitar My Love’s an Arbutus – Guitar and MuseScore created Violin The Limejuice Ship – Guitar O ‘Twas in the Broad Atlantic (Married to a Mermaid) – Guitar Bonny Mary of Argyle – Autoharp Birlinn Ghodraigh Chrobhan – Guitar Beautiful Island – Guitar; Electric Guitar; Bass and Harmonica – My own composition (Electric Guitar and Bass played by my late friend Ian Blacklaw Richardson). Borderlands – Guitar Gentle on my Mind – 5-string Banjo In My Life – Guitar Pennsylvania Polka – Guitar Da Slockit Light – Guitar with MuseScore created Violin If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/5-string banjo/autoharp
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Guitar: My Master's Call (Including lyrics and chords) Written and performed by Marty Robbins, My Master's Call appeared on his 1959 album "Gunfighter Ballads And Trail Songs". It has been requested by subscriber Nima Pourkarimi.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: With My Little Stick Of Blackpool Rock (Including lyrics and chords) I have uploaded a few of George Formby's better known songs recently and commenting on one of them, subscriber Athull08 requested this song, so I have given it a try. Like many of Formby's songs, this one was written by Harry Gifford and Fred Cliffe. Like his song "When I'm Cleaning Windows", "With My Little Stick of Blacpool Rock" was banned by the BBC as Wikipedia explains: "In 1946 the song "With My Little Stick of Blackpool Rock", which Formby had recorded in 1937, began to cause problems at the BBC for broadcasts of Formby or his music. The producer of one of Formby's live television programmes received a letter from a BBC manager that stated "We have no record that "With My Little Stick of Blackpool Rock" is banned. We do however know and so does Formby, that certain lines in the lyric must not be broadcast". Other sources, including the BBC, state that the song was banned from being broadcast." I realised I had omitted one line of the song when I came to add the annotations, the line being: "Every day wherever I stray the kids all round me flock", which should have been included after the line: "No wonder every girl I danced with stuck to me tight", but felt it did not detract from the performance, so I did not re-record it.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Green Eyes (Including lyrics and chords) I was introduced to this song a few weeks ago by my friend Steve Cain who plays and sings at our Tuesday night sessions. Written and performed by Kate Wolf, and American folk singer/songwriter. Kate sadly passed away aged only 44 after a long battle with leukemia in 1986. Trying to get the timing as close to hers as I could has taken a while, but here is my interpretation of her lovely song.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Oak and the Ash (The) (Including lyrics and chords) "The Oak and the Ash" is today's upload from the BBC programme "Singing Together". The song dates back to at least the eighteenth century as evidenced by the following: Sir Walter Scott, in his novel Rob Roy, makes the narrator of the tale (Francis Osbaldiston) in recounting recollections of his childhood, tell how his Northumbrian nurse (old Mabel) amused him by singing the ditties of her native countie, and specially names O! the Oak and the Ash and the bonny Ivy Tree as a Northumbrian ballad. The stately tune started life as a dance tune, found in many places and under many titles but especially in Sir James Hawkin's Transcripts of music for the virginals, and the Dancing Master, of 1650, under the title Goddesses. I have made my own chord progression for the song and have experimented by playing the first sequence of chords Am, G, F and E starting up the neck rather than my usual open chording.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - 5-string banjo
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Guitar: O 'Twas In The Broad Atlantic (Married to a Mermaid) (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" according to the site: "Contemplator", first appeared in 1740 in The Masque of Alfred by James Thomson (1700-1748) and David Mallet. There is debate over which of them actually wrote it. In 1751 Mallett altered the words, omitting three of the original six stanzas and adding three others, written by Lord Bolingbroke. It became extremely popular when Mallet produced his Masque of Britannia at Drury Lane Theatre in 1755. I uploaded the version from "Contemplator" some years ago under the title "Married to a Mermaid!, but this version is slightly different. As with most of the songs in the "Singing Together" series, I have created my own chord progression for it.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: My Bonny Cuckoo (Including lyrics and chords) A short but sweet song today from the BBC programme "Singing Together". According to the notes in the pamphlet: This is taken from the Carendon Song Book II, Oxford University Press. The tune is noted as 'Old Irish Air' but is not further identified. It is generally considered that Carolan used this tune as the basis for his Si Bheag, Si Mhor. Once again, the chord progression I am using is of my own devising.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Mountain Duel (Including lyrics and chords) Today's upload from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is a song about a young man fighting the elements to reach his true love, only to find her unimpressed by his efforts. The pamphlet acknowledges John Emlyn Edwards for the lyrics, but does not say if he is the author or a translator. Again, the chord progression I am using is of my own devising.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar and MuseScore Violin: My Love's An Arbutus (Including lyrics and chords) Still picking songs from the BBC programme "Singing Together", this one has lyrics written by A P Graves, an Irish poet and songwriter. The melody is a traditional Irish tune: "I rise in the morning with my heart full of woe": a Cavan air. Also known as "The Coola Shore". As I was not familiar with this tune, I wrote out the score, but felt the tempo was far too fast, so after listening to a version posted on YT by Thomascow Mc Mullan I changed the tempo and have experimented by playing the MuseScore created violin and playing my guitar and singing over it to produce this video. The chord progression is of my own devising. The word "Machree" is an Anglicization of the Irish "mo chroí", an exclamation meaning "my heart", a term of endearment.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/musescore violin
Video
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MuseScore created Violin: Baby Pipes (Instrumental) This is a tune I composed a couple of days ago. I played it on my penny whistle, but I am not accomplished enough on that to play along with the video, so I wrote it out in MuseScore and for convenience set it as a violin voice as they do not seem to have a bagpipe voice. (I had to mark the score as fortississimo (very loud) to get enough volume for this recording, but if playing it on an instrument it does not reuire and dynamics. My friend Sharon plays flute, whistles and bagpipes. She often brings her small pipes to our sessions as they are not as loud as the big pipes. She calls them her baby pipes, hence the title of this tune.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Musescore violin
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Guitar: Llangollen Market (Including lyrics and chords) Another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together", Llangollen Market is a Welsh folk song in which the singer bemoans that her lover has gone away, (though why we do not know), and she will not go to the market where they used to meet until he returns. Again, I was able to work out the melody from the score, but the chord progression I had to work out for myself. (I was at a picnic after or walk last Thursday and unfortunately we were attacked by a swarm of midges, hence the angry looking lumps on my head. Apart from their unpleasant appearance, they do not hurt or itch, though the ones around my ankles itced like crazy for a few days.)
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: My Old Man (Including lyrics and chords) Written by Ewan MacColl, (real name: James Henry Miller), "My Old Man" is a song about a Sheffield steel worker. He worked for a company called the Cyclops Steel Works which later merged with the Openshaw Works of Manchester to create the English Steel Corporation.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Linstead Market (Including lyrics and chords) Linstead Market is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" this one published in the summer of 1978. Wikipedia informs us that: "Linstead Market" is a Jamaican folk song of the mento type that tells of a mother who goes to the market with her ackee fruit but does not sell any, with the result that her children will go hungry. A quattie (or quatty) is a low value coin worth about a penny -halfpenny in pre-decimal currency. I vaguely remember this song and think it was probqbly one sung by Cliff Hall as a member of the Liverpool folk band The Spinners.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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2019 May walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of May. The weather this month has been mixed as is often the case in May. Fine weather at the beginning of the month, but rain and colder temperatures later. All walks went ahead as scheduled though. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: First of May - Autoharp The Green Grass Grows All Around – Guitar When I’m Cleaning Windows– Guitar La Pique – Guitar Hey Ho The Morning Dew – Guitar From a Distance – Guitar Da Slockit Light – Guitar with MuseScore created Violin Smoky Mountain Rain – Guitar The Leprehaun – Guitar Jenny Go Gentle –Guitar Leaning on a Lamp-post – Guitar Riding in the TT Races – Guitar It’s Magic – Guitar Following The Leader – Guitar Jack and Bramble – Mandolin, Guitar and MuseScore created Violin If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
Received lots of comments & props
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3,526  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/autoharp/mandolin
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Guitar: Leprehaun (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for a short amusing little ditty called The Leprehaun. Leprehauns are Irish fairy folk and tradition has it that if you catch one, they are supposed to give you a fortune in gold. However, they are mischievous beings and tricky, so even though the singer of this song succeeds in capturing one of them, he is tricked and gets nothing for his troubles. According to the footnote in the pamphlet: The song appears to have been written by Patrick Weston Joyce, c.1873, though it's also attributed to his brother, Robert Dwyer Joyce, who wrote the words of The Boys of Wexford. Like all of the songs I have been performing from "Singing Together", I have put my own chord progression to the melody.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Riding in the TT Races (Including lyrics and chords) This is number three of songs performed by George Formby that I have learned in readiness for a sing-around at sheltered accommodation in Ramsey next week at the request of one of the residents. "Riding in the TT Races" was not only performed by Formby, but written by him and Harry Gifford and Frederick E. Cliffe and was featured in the film "No Limit" in which he starred. Wikipedia has the following about the film: No Limit is a 1935 British musical comedy starring George Formby and Florence Desmond. The film, which was directed by Monty Banks, was made on location at the TT motorcycle race on the Isle of Man. It was the first of eleven films that Formby made with Associated Talking Pictures. Although Formby had already made two moderately successful films (Boots! Boots! and Off the Dole), No Limit was the film that put him on the road to stardom. It is still regarded as one of his best and funniest featuring good songs, humorous scenes and numerous stunts. The TT races are still run in the Isle of Man and in fact today is the final day of "TT week", though sad to relate, the weather for this year's event has not been good and has played havoc with the schedules. However, I believe they managed to organize things in such a way that most of the races were completed even if the number of laps had to be curtailed. George Formby performed the song accompanying himself on the ukulele banjo, an instrument on which he was particularly skilled. I don't play the uke, so am using my guitar and have simplified the chord progression to suit my own limited abilities.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: It's Magic (Including lyrics and chords) Three weeks ago, Doris Mary Kappelhoff passed away at the age of ninety-seven. She was better known as Doris Day, taking her stage name from a song she performed, "Day After Day". She was one of my favourite actresses and I particularly loved her performance as the title character from the musical "Calamity Jane". My friend Sylvia Horn sings a number of Doris Day's songs and asked me if I knew "It's Magic" as she wants to sing it, so I looked it up, worked out a chord progression that I am able to play and hope that soon, Sylvia will be able to sing it to my accompaniment. According to Wikipedia: "It's Magic" is a popular song written by Jule Styne, with lyrics by Sammy Cahn. The song was introduced by Doris Day in her film debut, Romance on the High Seas (known in the United Kingdom as It's Magic after the song), and was published in 1947. Versions which made the Billboard magazine charts in 1948 were recorded by Doris Day, Tony Martin, Dick Haymes, Gordon MacRae, and Sarah Vaughan. It was nominated for a Best Song Oscar in 1948, losing to "Buttons and Bows." In 1952, Doris Day made the song the theme of The Doris Day Show, her Hollywood radio series. This video is my own interpretation of the song.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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The Limejuice Ship (Including lyrics and chords) This is another song of the sea I found in the catalogue of songs from the BBC programme "Singing Together". In the days of sail, on long voyages, great loss of life was caused by the disease, "scurvy". A Scottish doctor experimented with citrus fruits such as lemons and oranges and found that regular use of these prevented the disease and eventually crews of British ships were given doses of lemon juice in particular often added to their daily ration of "grog". At that time, the word "lime" was often used to refer to any of the citrus fruits. North American sailors would refer to the British sailors in a derogatory way as "Limeys" . (Lime juice was not in fact as effectual for curing "scurvy" as lemon or orange juice, but was also tried for a while). Another reason that British sailors were healthier than other nationalities was cleanliness aboard their ships. Much of the crew's time on deck was spent scrubbing with holystones to keep them clean, so even when they were not aloft in the rigging, the sailor's working hours were filled with hard work and they needed to be strong and healthy. The "limejuice" helped keep them strong and healthy. The melody I was able to work out from the score, but the chord progression I am using is of my own devising. Singing together was a programme for school children, so I was very surprised to find that in the chorus, the line which I sing as "...damn and beggar the navy..." was in the pamphlet "...damn and bugger the navy..." I did not feel comfortable singing that, so changed the word to "beggar"
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: La Pique (Including lyrics and chords) This song comes from the summer 1979 edition of the BBC programme "Singing Together". The following information comes from mudcat.org in a discussion on the song: "The Pique was a 36-gun frigate, and was, according to Whall [Sea Songs and Shanties], 'the flash packet of the Navy in her day'. He puts the date of the song at about 1838, a period when the ship was particularly notorious for spit-and-polish. The song seems to have been a favourite in both Navy and merchant service, and 'The Dreadnought' was made in imitation of it." Mudcat provided the score, but did not include chords, so once again the chord progression is of my own devising.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: John Kanaka (Including lyrics and chords) *John Kanaka" is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". Footnote from the pamphlet reads: Source: Hugill, Stan, (1969), Shanties and Sailors Songs, London, Herbert Jenkins. Stan Hugill wrote: This halyard song is the only known representative of a sizeable group of Anglicized Polynesian work-songs popular at one time among seamen in the various Pacific Islands trades. Dana, in his Two Years before the Mast, refers to such songs and the singing of them by Mahana, an Hawaiian shantyman in the hide carriers of the Pacific Slope of America in the 1830s He also says "The writer collected this version from a coloured seaman from Barbados, in the West Indies." The following comes from "Sea Songs and Chanteys": This was a “long haul” chantey, used at the halyards for hoisting up the sails. Many Hawaiians worked aboard ships that sailed the Pacific, and were renowned for their excellent seamanship. English-speaking sailors often had difficulty pronouncing their names, however and so called them by the Hawaiian name "Kanaka," which means "Hawaiian Man." The lyrics "tu lai-e" also come from the Hawaiian language, and are a remnant of the chantey singing tradition of combining the music and language of different seafaring cultures. The chord progression I am using is of my own devising.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Jenny Go Gentle (Including lyrics and chords) This is yet another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". It is a variant on the Scottish song ""Wee Cooper of Fyfe", this one sourced from The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs. The chord progression is of my own devising.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: I Will Give You The Keys of Heaven (Including lyrics and chords) This song is another from the BBC programme "Singing Together". The following are notes from the publication: Source: Lucy Broadwood and J A Fuller Maitland. 1893, English County Songs, Leadenhall Press, London Notes: From the Rev S. Baring-Gould, who had it from the Rev F Partridge. Lucy Broadwood wrote: The first two stanzas and the tune come from CHeshire, the other verses were forgotten, but are restored from an East country version. In a version sent from Masham, Yorkshire, the second line of verse 1 runs; "To lock the gates when the clock strikes seven." See Halliwell's Popular Rhymes, p 21; Chambers's Rhymes of Scotland, p 213; Mason's Country Songs, for other versions. In many the lady's cupidity is at last excited by some especially magnificent offer, and, on her consenting, the man refuses to have anything to do with her. As this is a song for two people, a man and a woman, I have shown the male's lyrics in white and the female's lyrics in red. The song is similar to "Paper of Pins", but in this case, the man's courtship proves to be successful and the lady is not a "gold digger".
Received lots of comments & props
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1,288  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Hey Ho The Morning Dew (Including lyrics and chords) "Hey Ho The Morning Dew" is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" published in their Autumn 1973 edition. They attribute the song as being Irish, but there is no definintive provenance that this is so. I just liked the tune and created my own chord progression for it by ear.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar and Violin: Da Slockit Light (Instrumental including score with chords) A bit of a departure today from my usual uploads. One of our Friday night session musicians suggested a new accompaniment to the tune "Da Slockit Light", so I have recorded my guitar over a MuseScore violin version of the tune. The tune was written by Shetland fiddler Tom (Tammy) Anderson, who according to Wikipedia said the following about his inspitation for the tune: "I was coming out of Eshaness in late January, 1969, the time was after 11 pm and as I looked back at the top of the hill leading out of the district, I saw so few lights compared to what I remembered when I was young. As I watched, the lights started going out one by one. That, coupled with the recent death of my wife, made me think of the old word ‘Slockit’ meaning, a light that has gone out, and I think that is what inspired the tune" – from a taped interview with Tammy by a student in 1970.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/musescore violin
Video
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Guitar: When I'm Cleaning Windows (Including lyrics and chords) Having uploaded the George Formby song "Leaning on a Lamp-post" a couple of days ago, I thought I would have a go at another oh his songs, namely "When I'm Cleaning Windows". Wikipedia has the following about the song: "When I'm Cleaning Windows" is a comedy song performed by Lancastrian comic, actor and ukulele player George Formby. It first appeared in the 1936 film Keep Your Seats, Please. The song was credited as written by Formby, Harry Gifford and Frederick E. Cliffe. Formby performed the song in A♭ in Keep Your Seats, Please. For the single release, the key was changed to B♭. The song was so successful that George Formby recorded another version of the song entitled "The Window Cleaner (No. 2)". This song uses similar orchestration to the original version and it is about further things which were seen on a window cleaning round. Because the song’s lyrics were racy for the time, it was banned by the BBC from being played on the radio. The corporation's director general John Reith stated that "if the public wants to listen to Formby singing his disgusting little ditty, they'll have to be content to hear it in the cinemas, not over the nation's airwaves"; Formby and his wife and manager Beryl Ingham were furious with the block on the song. In May 1941, Ingham informed the BBC that the song was a favourite of the royal family, particularly Queen Mary, while a statement by Formby pointed out that "I sang it before the King and Queen at the Royal Variety Performance". The BBC relented and started to broadcast the song. The record's sales were so successful that Regal Zonophone awarded Formby the first silver disc for sales of over 100,000 copies.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Leaning on a Lamp-post (Including lyrics and chords) At the monthly sing-around at Kerroo Glass shetered accommodation in Ramsey last week, one of the ladies requested that I do the song she remembered from the George Formby film "No Limit". She couldn't remember the name of the song, but it came to her after a little time and was "Leaning on a Lamp-post". The song was written by Noel Gay and was in fact used in a George Formby film, "Feather Your Nest". It was incorporated in the musical "Me and My Girl" in 1985, though not in the original 1937 version of that show. For those not familiar with some of the chords, I am playing the following as shown below: Gmaj7 = 320002; G6 = 320000;l D6 = x00303. The ukulele is not an instrument I can play, so I have worked out my own accompaniment on the guitar using a much simplified chord progression. George Formby is very much associated with the Isle of Man, especially for his film "No Limit" which has been shown in cinemas in the island every year around the time of the TT races, and there is a statue of George in racing gear with his banjo leaning against a lamp-post on Regent Street in Douglas
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Green Grass Grows All Around (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by "jdbeard184", I had thought that I had uploaded this song some time ago, but then realised it was not this one, but "The Rattling Bog" (https://youtu.be/NbOfcKpcsK8) which is basically the same song, but to a different tune and a slight difference in the lyrics. Both songs are cumulative, making it more and more difficult to get all the words in on one breath!
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Bonnie Ship The Diamond (Including lyrics and chords) In response to a comment from subscriber, Paul Wunder, on my first upload of this song which I did nine years ago using inferior recording equipment, I have done a newer version which I present here. The following information is what I included with my first version: "The Bonnie Ship The Diamond" is an old Scottish song popularized by The Corries and Bob Dylan. The following information comes from the site from which I acquired the lyrics: Over-fishing in the Greenland sea during the early 19th century had a devastating toll on the whale stocks. A new hunting ground, the South-West Fishery, was discovered in the region of the Davis Straits and it was mostly here that The Diamond fished. In 1830 The Diamond, Eliza Swan and The Resolution along with seventeen other whaling ships were caught in the ice of Melville Bay. The ships were lost and many sailors lost their lives.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Smoky Mountain Rain (Including lyrics and chords) Another request from my American pen friend Tammy Statler, Smoky Mountain Rain also introduced me to an American country singer who I had not come across before. Wikipedia has the following about the song and singer: "Smoky Mountain Rain" is a song written by Kye Fleming and Dennis Morgan, and recorded by American country music singer Ronnie Milsap. It was released in September 1980 as the first single from his Greatest Hits album. The single became one of his best-known songs. The song was Milsap's 16th number one hit on Billboard magazine's Hot Country Singles chart where it stayed at the top for one week in December 1980. "Smoky Mountain Rain" also fared well as a crossover hit and was his first of two number one hits on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart (the other being "Any Day Now"), as well as number 24 on the Billboard Hot 100. In 2010, "Smoky Mountain Rain" became Tennessee's eighth state song as a result of action by the Tennessee General Assembly on June 3, 2010. In 2014, Rolling Stone magazine ranked "Smoky Mountain Rain" number 96 in their list of the 100 greatest country songs.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Locked Out Blues (Including lyrics and chords) This is another song written and performed by my late friend Ian Blacklaw Richardson. A video of Ian playing and singing this one with me accompanying him on the harmonica can be seen at: https://youtu.be/ouM175zQeis Ian, or Max as he was known, was a far more accomplished guitarist than I am, and I used to love to play along with him on my harmonica.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/harmonica
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Guitar: From a Distance (Including lyrics and chords) Another song introduced to me by my American pen friend Tammy Statler, "From a Distance" was written by Julie Gold and originally recorded by Nanci Griffiths in 1987, then covered by Bette Midler in 1990. I have based my own interpretation on the Bette Midler version.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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2019 April walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of April. The weather this month has been kind with plenty of sunny days, though east winds did bring with them hazy air which sometimes made it difficult to see the lovely views expected. Conversely, it also had the effect of making conditions perfect for taking shots of the sun as it was setting. All walks went ahead as scheduled. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: Take a Long Walk – Guitar – Written by my good friend Ian Blacklaw Richardson better known as Msx. Forgive Me – Guitar – Also written by Max. Flowers on the Wall – Guitar It must be love – Guitar Sound of Silence – Guitar Castles in the Air – Guitar I Still Miss Someone – Guitar The Old Rustic Bridge – Guitar More Than a Name on the Wall – Guitar Wait Till The Clouds Roll By – Autoharp ‘Til The Rivers All Run Dry – Guitar Song For The Captain – Guitar We Should Be Together – Guitar When It’s Springtime In The Rockies – Autoharp Si Bheag Si Mhor – Autoharp If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/autoharp
Video
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Guitar: Castles in the Air (Including lyrics and chords) This song was written by Anne Swithinbank and was performed by the Liverpool folk group, "The Spinners" in 1975. This is not the same song as Don McLean's "Castles in the Air" which is in fact what led me to this one thanks to subscriber Allie Riley who wrote a comment on my version of the Don McLean song mentioning the Anne Swithinbank song. I found the lyrics easily enough but had to work out the chord progression for myself. I chose to sing and play in the key of Eb simply because that is the key in which The Spinners did it.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Till The Rivers All Run Dry (Including lyrics and chords) Till The Rivers All Run Dry, (or more correctly; "Til The Rivers All Run Dry), is a song performed by Don Williams and written by himself and Wayland Holyfield. It comes as a request from my American pen friend Tammy Statler. In playing the accompaniment to this one, I have chosen to play the G chord in the first three lines of the chorus using the D chord shape moved up five frets.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: More Than A Name On The Wall (Including lyrics and chords) This song is another that my American pen friend Tammy Statler introduced to me and comes from the repertoir of "The Statler Brothers", no relation to Tammy though. The song was written by Jimmy Fortune and John Rimel and was released in 1989, reaching number 6 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles Chart.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Song For The Captain (Including lyrics and chords) A request from subscriber "Nima Pourkarimi" introduced this song to me. I was unable to find any information about the song other than it was one of the tracks on Roger Whittaker's 1980 album "Voyager" and is attributed to "Hansell, Parker". Not being able to find the lyrics to the song, even with help from Mudcat.org, I eventually resorted to transcribing them from a YouTube video. This led me to create a "mondegreen" when I could not quite decide what one of the lines in the song actually said. At first, I heard: "tied water canyons" which made no sense to me, so I thought it must me "tight water canyons". I created my video, adding the annotatioins and was about to upload it when I decided to give Roger Whittaker's video another listen as I was still not satisfied that I had it right. This time, it dawned on me there is another way of spelling "tied", i.e. "tide" and that made much more sense, so I re-recorded the song and added the annotations which you see now. The chords too are my own interpretation of the song.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Flowers on the Wall (Including lyrics and chords) "Flowers on the Wall" is another song requested by my American pen friend, Tammy Statler who as far as I know is not related to the Statler Brothers who performed the song. According to Wikipedia: "Flowers on the Wall" is a song made famous by the country music group The Statler Brothers. Written and composed by the group's original tenor, Lew DeWitt, the song peaked in popularity in January 1966, spending four weeks at No. 2 on the Billboard magazine Hot Country Singles chart, and reaching No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song was used in the soundtrack to the 1994 film Pulp Fiction and as the title theme of the 2001-2002 BBC Radio 4 sitcom Linda Smith's A Brief History of Timewasting. I remember this one from my college days. They say: if you remember the 60's, you weren't there! In that case, I guess I wasn't really there!!!
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: We Should Be Together (Including lyrics and chords) This song, written and performed by Don Williams is another request from my American pen friend Tammy Statler. It was released in 1974 and reached number five in the charts.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Old Rustic Bridge By The Mill (The) (Including lyrics and chords) This is a request from my young American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth. The song was written by T.P.Keenan from Castletownroche, Fermoy, Co Cork. An article on Castletownrioche on Facebook has the following: ''The Old Rustic Bridge by the Mill'', composed by T P Keenan is synonymous with Castletownroche. Known in his profession as Tommy Conway, he was a versatile and prolific writer and composer. When you list his compositions, among them are '' When Irish Eyes are Shining'', ''Mother Macree'', That's an Irish Lullaby'' you realise he must have been one of the greatest writer of Irish popular songs. He was an all round performer, singing, dancing, playing the piano, providing all all his own material when he toured the country doing the circuits of music halls all over the country. While in Co. Cork with his company in 1927, Tommy got pneumonia and died. He was 61 years of age. He was buried in Castletownroche Cemetery overlooking the Bridge on the river Awbeg and the Mill.His grave was unmarked for 53 years until locals erected a memorial to his memory on the wall inside the Cemetery gate, the exact spot where he was buried is unknown. Thomas Keenan dedicated many song to his late wife Margaret Lillis whom he married in the early 1890's, among these were ''The Old Rustic Bridge by the Mill''. In looking for information about the song, I discovered that according to the Library of Congress, the song is attributed to a J.P.Skelly. Whether J.P.Skelly was a pseudonym for T.P.Keenan or whenter he was a plagorist, I do not know. As I was singing the song, I had great difficulty with the line "the old rustic bridge". I could not get out of my head a similar line in the song "The Old Rugged Cross". Without realising it at the time, I ended up singing "the old rugged bridge", but have decided to keep it rather than try to re-record the whole song. The annotations give the correct lyrics!
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Autoharp: Wait Till The Clouds Roll By Jenny (Including lyrics and chords) When checking out my music files the other day, I came across the lyrics for this song which I can only assume was requested by somebody, but I did not get around to performing it. My apologies to that person for my tardiness, but the old memory is not as good now as it was before it got so bad!!! The song was written as a parlour song in 1894 with words by T.J.Wood and music by H.J.Fulmer and has been covered by many artists including Uncle Dave Macon who was the first to record the song in 1939. The version I listened to and based my own recording on was by Foster and Allen. When I wrote out the title for the video, I omitted the name Jenny, but it should have been "Wait Till The Clouds Roll By, Jenny". When I wrote out the annotations, I had intended to play and sing the middle eight in the last verse slightly differently to the way it came out when I recorded it, so the annotations shown do not quite match up with what I am playing and singing.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
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Guitar: It Must Be Love (Including lyrics and chords) Another song from Don Williams, I was directed to this one by my American pen friend, Tammy Statler. Wikipedia has the following about the song: "It Must Be Love" is a song written by Bob McDill, and recorded by American country music artist Don Williams. It was released in July 1979 as the third single from the album Expressions. The song was Williams' ninth Number One single on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles charts. In 2000, country music artist Alan Jackson recorded a cover of the song and released it as the third single from his album Under the Influence. Like Williams' version before it, Alan's cover also reached Number One on the Billboard country charts, a position that it held for one week. It also managed to reach the Top 40 on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #37.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Forgive Me (Including lyrics and chords) This is another of the songs written by my friend Ian Blacklaw Richardson, better known as Max to his friends who passed away last year.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Take a Long Walk (Including lyrics and chords) A year ago this week, my good friend, singer/songwriter Ian Blacklaw Richardson and very accomplished guitarist suddenly lost the ability to play his guitar. The cause of this was discovered a few days later. He had a large aggressive tumour on his brain. It was incurable and within three months, it took his life. Tonight, we are holding a concert in his memory and I intend to sing some of his own songs at it. Ian, better known to us as Max, wrote hundreds of songs and performed them at our sing-around sessions each week. He wrote "Scotland Will Flourish" and the music for "My One and Only Love", both of which were recorded by "The Corries" "Take a Long Walk" is one I particularly loved as I would play an accompaniment to it on my harmonica as Max sang it. The first time we performed this one together was at a concert in Laxey videos of which can be found on my playlist "Max and Me": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Sadly, although he sang his songs regularly, there are only a few that I have the lyrics to and even fewer that I know the tunes of. Those I do know, I am going to upload from time to time.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Sound of Silence (Including lyrics and chords) A bit of self-indulgence today; I uploaded this song ten years ago when I was using a webcam for my recordings. The microphone was not too good and tended to cause crackling when I put any volume into my singing or playing. Also, I added the lyrics and chords using YouTube annotations, but these have become obsolete since 2017 and even though YouTube promised they would still be available, they have reneged on that promise. So I am presenting a new version with annotations on screen from my own editing app. The song of course was written by Paul Simon and performed by himself with Art Garfunkel, though the first time I heard it, it was performed by an Irish group called "The Bachelors".who recorded a cover version of the song in 1966, and this earned the group their last top 10 hit in both Ireland (#9) and the UK (#3). The original version by Simon & Garfunkel has never charted in either Ireland or the UK.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Song of the Shieldwall (Including lyrics and chords) This song is new to me and comes as a request for subscriber "Nima Pourkarimi". None of the videos I found of it on YT gave a clear impression of the tune, so I was despairing of being able to do it as I need to hear a song before I can perform it, but I was able to find the sheet music and lyrics at: https://angerweit.tikon.ch/lieder/fan..., so wrote it out using MuseScore, then listened to the tune repeatedly until I had it fixed in my head. I recorded it and realised that in verse two I had mispronounced the word "fyrdmen" as "freedmen", but apart from that, the rest of the recording was good, so I have presented the song as is including the mispronunciation. Set during the period of British history of the eleventh century, the song is attributed to T: Malkin Grey (Debra Doyle) M: Peregrynne Windrider (Melissa Williamson).
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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2019 March walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of March. The weather at the start of the month was not kind, with rain falling during the first couple of walks, but they went ahead despite this. Happily, the weather improved for the remainder of the month and on some of the walks, we even doffed outer clothing when it got too warm. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: I’m No Stranger to the Rain – Guitar Lord, I Hope This Day is Good – Guitar Birlinn Ghodraidh Chrobhain – Guitar Si Bheag Si Mhor – Autoharp instrumental The Northwest Passage – Guitar Birthday of St Patrick – Autoharp Scraping Up Sand At The Bottom Of The Sea – Guitar Men of Harlech – Guitar The Handsome Butcher – Guitar Queen Anne’s Lace – Autoharp The First of May – Autoharp Some Broken Hearts Never Mend – Guitar Three Maidens a-milking Did Go – Guitar Tulips from Amsterdam – Autoharp Three Pirates Came to London Town – Guitar Sunset – Autoharp instrumental – my own composition. If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar/autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: When It's Springtime In The Rockies (Including lyrics and chords) Written by Mary Hale Woolsey, "When It's Springtime in the Rockies" was recorded by Gene Autry, but I have based my performance on a recording by a group called "Sons of the Pioneers". Wikipedia informs us: The song gained popularity in the Provo area and at Brigham Young University. Earl J. Glade, manager of the KSL radio station in Salt Lake City, Utah, named "When It's Springtime in the Rockies" the national song of Utah and the West. A popular radio duo of the time, Bob and Monte, was requested to sing the song and later record it. After the recording was sent to publishers thirteen times, it was finally released. Later Milt Taggart, who was the head of a music store in Salt Lake, had the copy of the song. He made a contract with Woolsey and Sauer that he would split the profits with them if there were any. They sold the song to Charlie Daniels. Milt Taggart was named the co-author. The song was heard worldwide and became a bestseller in England. The instrument I am playing is a 21-bar chromatic "ChromAharp" which I acquired recently with a view to selling it on.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
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Guitar: I Still Miss Someone (Including lyrics and chords) "I Still Miss Someone" is a song written by Johnny Cash and his nephew Roy Cash Jr. and was first recorded by Johnny Cash in 1958 when was released as the B-side to "Don't Take Your Guns To Town". I thought I had done this one before, but discovered it is one that slipped me by, so here is my interpretation of it.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
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Guitar: Some Broken Hearts Never Mend (Including lyrics and chords) Another song requested by my American pen friend, Tammy Statler, "Some Broken Hearts Never Mend" is a song written by Wayland Holyfield, and recorded by American country music artist Don Williams. It was released in January 1977 as the first single from the album Visions. "Some Broken Hearts Never Mend" was Don Williams' sixth number one on the country chart. The single stayed at number one for a single week and spent a total of 12 weeks within the top 40. The song was also an international hit for Telly Savalas. It topped the Swiss charts for two weeks, and peaked at No. 2 in Austria and No. 4 in Netherlands. The Bellamy Brothers covered the song in 1999 in a reggae style for the album Reggae Cowboy. This version was also a single, but did not chart.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Guitar: Handsome Butcher (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to my source of songs from the BBC programme, Singing Together. "The Handsome Butcher" comes from the Autumn 1974 pamphlet, but there is no information regarding its origin or source. I believe however that it is an English translation of an Hungarian folk song. There are only three verses, so I sang the first verse again to lengthen it.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Tulips From Amsterdam (Including lyrics and chords) I uploaded a guitar accompanied version of this song five years ago and included a little story of how I met the entertainer, Max Bygraves, who was a childhood hero to me and who made this song popular in the UK. As a young man, I took up the game of golf and after playing for about a year on my local course at Port Erin, I felt competent enough to try to tackle Castletown Golf Links but as I was on my own I asked the professional if he could fix me up with a partner to play with. After a bit of a wait, he managed to get me a game with none other than Max Bygraves and a friend, and so I actually met my childhood hero and found that he was indeed a very nice unassuming man. Tulips From Amsterdam was originally a German song written by Klaus-Günter Neumann but it was re-written by Ernst Bader, with a new tune written by Ralf Arnie. Today I am uploading a version using the autoharp as our monthly challenge for the Manx Autoharpers was to find a song about Spring, and this is my offering. Incidentally, I am playing this one without using picks, but if I were to play it for an audience, I would probably use them.
Received lots of comments & props
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
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Guitar: Men of Harlech (Including lyrics and chords) I have uploaded a version of this song using my 12-string guitar for accompaniment, but have been requested to do a six-string version by subscriber " LokiTheKing". This is a powerful marching song to rally the troops. Of course it started life as a Welsh song in their fight against the Saxon invader, i.e. the English, but in later years became a favourite of British Troops of all nations of the British Isles. One of the most moving renditions of it can be heard in the film Zulu when the beleaguered troop of Welsh Engineers are about to face the final battle with the far superior numbers of the Zulu warriors at Rourke's Drift. There are a number of variations in the words, this being a version of the song that appeared in The Songs of Wales, (ed. Brinley Richards, 1873). In this version the words are by John Oxenford.
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Anthony Archibald - Guitar
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Autoharp: Queen Anne's Lace (Including lyrics and chords) My American pen friend, Tammy Statler, introduced me to this song which was written by David Olney and performed by The Del McCoury Band. New to me, here is my interpretation of this bluegrass number. My aplogies for being so close to the camera that you cannot see my left hand, but my eyesight is not as good as it once was and I had to be close enough to my computer screen to read the lyrics.
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Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
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