Anthony Archibald - Guitar - The Cronk Iliam Scratchers at a Hooley in the Barn
21,527 views on fandalism
5
The Cronk Iliam Scratchers at a Hooley in the Barn
Uploaded 7 years ago
Autoharp: Across the Alley from the Alamo (Including lyrics and chords) The Manx Autoharpers have their first monthly meeting of the new decade this afternoon and for individual performances, we have a theme which this month is "prepositions", so with this in mind, I am going to do "Across the Alley from the Alamo" which contains a few of them such as "across; from ; along; to; etc. Wikipedia has the following about the song: Across the Alley from the Alamo is a song written in 1946 by Joe Greene, which has become a jazz standard. The Mills Brothers' recording of the song scored #2 on the U.S. Billboard chart in 1947, and there were cover versions that same year by Woody Herman and his Orchestra and by Stan Kenton and his Orchestra with vocalist June Christy.
Received lots of comments & props
3
117  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Don't Give Up till It's Over (Including lyrics and chords) Today's upload is a request from subscriber "athull08. Somewhat surprisingly, it is a song from The Dubliners that seems to have eluded me. I thought I had covered all of the songs of theirs, but did not know this one.
Received lots of comments & props
3
149  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Deadman's Gun (Including lyrics and chords) A request from "Famson" led me to this song from Ashtar Command (Indie band consisting of Chris Holmes and Brian Liesegang). It comes from the soundtrack of Red Dead Redemption, a western themed video game. I uploaded the song "That's the Way It Is" a few days ago which came from Red Dead Redemption 2, so I agreed to give this one a try too.
Received lots of comments & props
2
140  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Puff the Magic Dragon {with happy ending} (Including lyrics and chords) At our weekly sing-around last Tuesday we had a theme of children's games; toys and playthings. My friend Peter sang "Puff the Magic Dragon", but his version had extras verses to the original Peter, Paul and Mary song I knew. I looked it up and this is what I found. Many people felt unhappy that the ending of the song was so sad they came up with happier endings, the one I am singing being one of them.
Received lots of comments & props
2
171  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: That's the Way It Is (Including lyrics and chords) A request from "Muikku" led me to this song which I had not come across before. Written by Daniel Lanois and Rocco DeLuca, and performed by Lanois it is the soundtrack for a video game, "Red Redemption 2" I have attempted to cover the song in my own style using my 12-string guitar for accompaniment.
Received lots of comments & props
3
354  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: You Can't Go Back Again (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge for January on the UK Autohap Facebook page is "looking forward or looking back". I have chosen this song written by Dick Curless, an American Country singer and song writer as I feel it fits the challenge regarding "looking back".
Received lots of comments & props
5
363  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
2019 December walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly video diary of walks undertaken during the month of December, mainly in the company of members of the Manx Footpaths Conservation Group. As in November has been a month of very mixed weather this year. We have had some lovely fine days, some cloudy overcast days and some downright wet and miserable days, and at least two of the scheduled walks for Thursdays were cancelled. The photographs shown in this video are but highlights from the walks. If you would like to see more of the photos from all my walks, go to https://photos.google.com/albums The musical tracks accompanying the video are: The Mouth of the Tobique – Violin; Flute; Bodhran; Guitars, (6 and 12-string) Marshmallow World – Guitar I Saw the Star Up High – Guitar Mary Mild – Autoharp Way Me Susiana – Guitar Leave Your Sheep – Autoharp (My own composition) Christmas Island – 12-string Guitar When a Child is Born – Guitar See Amid the Winter’s Snow – Autoharp The Trail of the Lonesome Pine – Guitar Caroling, Caroling – Guitar Christmas Day in the Morning – Guitar Christ Was Born on Christmas Day – Guitar Casey Jones – Guitar Bus Stop – 12-string Guitar The Mighty Atlantic – 12-string Guitar Always the Winner – 12-string Guitar
Received lots of comments & props
2
322  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/12-string guitar/autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: The Closest Thing to Crazy (Including lyrics and chords) My good friend Peter Corkhill performs this Katie Melua song often and I thought I would like to give it a go. I must admit, I do not do it anywhere near as well as he does, but here is my humble attempt. I am playing the G4 chord as follows: xx0013.
Received lots of comments & props
2
318  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Granny's Old Armchair (Including lyrics and chords) I received a request for "Granny's Old Armchair" a couple of days ago from Fred Coombs. There is some considerable doubt as to who wrote this song, but the version Fred directed me to is performed by Malcolm Stewart. All agree however that it was a music hall song from the latter part of the nineteenth century. I have used a chord progression of my own devising for the accompaniment, not finding it in Ultimate Guitar or any other sites I usually rely on.
2
268  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
2020 Calendar HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE I created a calendar published by Vista Print, made up using one photo per month taken on my walks during the year, each photo representing the month it was taken. The photo for December was not taken in 2019, but on Christmas Day 2010, the first time in my lifetime that I can recall there being snow at Christmas. I could only afford a limited number to share with close friends so I thought I would share them to a wider audience by creating this video. The musical accompaniment was recorded at our Friday night music session at The Manor Hotel in Willaston last Friday night. The recording is a French/Canadian tune called "The Mouth of the Tobique". Players are: Robin Boyle - Hardanger Fiddle Sharon Christian - Flute Geoff Robinson - Bodhran Tony Archibald - Guitar
Received lots of comments & props
4
411  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/hardanger fiddle/flute
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Bus Stop (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by Ken Shuttlesworth, "Bus Stop" is a song performed by the British rock band, "The Hollies". From Wikipedia: "Bus Stop" was written by UK songwriter and future 10cc member Graham Gouldman, who also penned major hits for The Yardbirds ("For Your Love") and Herman's Hermits ("No Milk Today"), as well as the Hollies' first venture into the US top 40 with "Look Through Any Window". With the release of "Bus Stop" as a single in June 1966, the Hollies joined the trend known as raga rock, a subgenre first popularised by the Beatles, the Byrds and the Kinks. I am not skilled enough as an instrumentalist to attempt to play the guitar solo instrumental, so have simply made my own instrumental break.
Received lots of comments & props
3
311  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Casey Jones (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for a song published in their Summer 1967 pamphlet, "Casey Jones". I uploaded a slightly different version of this ballad about three years ago: https://youtu.be/MzQvb2NPxf4 The footnote for the Singing Together version of the song reads as follows: A slightly confusing acknowlegement is given for this on the pamphlet: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS for the words and music of 'Casey Jones' from Something to Sing published Oxford University Press. The following note appears in the Digital Tradition: Many songs have been sung about Casey Jones and the famous train wreck of 1909. At the time of the tragedy, according to one legend, Casey, throttle puller of the Illinois Central's crack Cannonball, was driving No. 638, making a run for a friend who was ill. The train was wrecked at Vaughn, Mississippi, and Casey died at the throttle. Wallace Saunders, his Negro engine wiper, set down the story of his death and it was sung to the then popular tune of "Jimmy Jones."
Received lots of comments & props
1
921  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: When a Child is Born (Including lyrics and chords) Wikipedia has the following article about this song: "When A Child Is Born" is a popular Christmas song. The original melody was "Soleado", a tune from 1974 by Ciro Dammicco (alias Zacar), composer for Italy's Daniel Sentacruz Ensemble, and Dario Baldan Bembo. The tune was based on Damicco's earlier tune "Le rose blu" published in 1972. The English language lyrics were written a few years later by Fred Jay (Friedrich Alex Jacobson IPI number 00015195204, who wrote many hits for Boney M such as Rasputin and Ma Baker). They do not make specific mention of Christmas but the importance they attach to looking forward to the birth of one particular child somewhere, anywhere, suggests a reference to the birth of Jesus Christ, and the citing of "a tiny star" that "lights up way up high" may allude to the Star of Bethlehem. Fred Jay's lyrics have been sung by many artists, most successfully by Johnny Mathis in 1976, whose version was the Christmas number one in the UK. I uploaded a version eleven years ago, but the recording equipment I was using then was a poor quality webcam on which there was interference if the volume of my voice was too great for the microphone. I have recorded it again and this time hopefully have the timing better in the spoken verse. I hope you like it. Merry Christmas everyone.
Received lots of comments & props
6
409  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Caroling, Caroling Christmas Bells Are Ringing (Including lyrics and chords) On switching on my computer this morning, I found a request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, for the carol: "Caroling, Caroling, Christmas Bells Are Ringing". Written in 1954 by Wilha Hutson and Alfred Burt and performed by Nat King Cole, I do not recall ever having heard it on this side of the pond, so it appeared to be a difficult challenge, especially as I was unable to find any chords for it from my usual source, Ultimate Guitar. I checked out Chordify and modified what I found there to the accompaniment I have used for this recording. Once I had the chords, it only took about half an hour to come up with this result. Hope you like it.
Received lots of comments & props
4
383  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: We Three Kings (Including lyrics and chords) Subscriber, "Jack Carter" asked did I have "We Three Kings" in my Christmas playlist. I was rather surprised to find that I did not have it, so am now addressing that omission. I only recorded it yesterday morning, and in the afternoon, with the help of some of my good friends who join me to entertain residents and friends at the sheltered accommodation at which I live, gave it its first public performance. Written and composed by John Henry Hopkins Jr. rector of Christ Episcopal Church in Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1857 under the title of "Three Kings of the Orient", it has become a very popular Christmas Carol throughout the world.
Received lots of comments & props
3
313  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Christmas Day in the Morning (Including lyrics and chords) Another carol from the BBC programme "Singing Together", this one comes from the Autumn 1966 pamphlet. The chords I show in the annotations are a guide for strumming, but I am playing a finger-style accompaniment, so may not look as if I am using them. In a discussion thread accompanying the song which I found on Joe Offer's mudcat cafe site, the following was presented by a Malcolm Douglas: The words were originally printed in Notes and Queries, 3rd series III, (53) 3 January 1863 page 6, contributed by 'A.A'. The text was reproduced in The Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, 5 (1) 1946, 32, without the full backgound information (such as it was). The full Notes and Queries entry can be seen at The Internet Library of Early Journals: 'EXTRAORDINARY CHRISTMAS CAROL. In a town in Mid Kent some children were going from house to house the other day, singing carols; one of them struck me as very odd; I took down the words as well as I could collect them, which ran thus,- "As I sat under a sycamore tree [the 1st three words three times] I looked me out upon the sea, A Christmas day in the morning. "I saw three ships a-sailing there, [three times, as before] The Virgin Mary and Christ they bare, A Christmas day in the morning. "He did whistle and she did sing [three times] And all the bells on earth did ring, A Christmas day in the morning. And now we hope to taste your cheer [three times] And wish you all a happy new year, A Christmas day in the morning." The children said there were a great many more verses, which they did not know. Has this very singular production ever been printed? The tune was that generally known among children as "A cold and frosty morning." A.A.' The tune set to the words here may be related, but is distinctly different from the familiar 'Here we go round the mulberry bush' / 'Nancy Dawson'. Four tunes were printed in JEFDSS (two from Kent, apparently) but none is obviously our melody here. So far I can't tell where that came from.
Received lots of comments & props
3
661  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Christ Was Born on Christmas Day (Including lyrics and chords) This carol comes from the BBC programme "Singing Together" and was published in their 1958 autumn term pamphlet. The only information given with it is that it is: Sixteenth century German melody. From "The Cowley Carol Book" (Mowbray) (The slightly unsightly sores on my fingers were caused by my stupidly scalding myself with steam when opening a microwave meal a week ago. They are healing up nicely now and don't cause any problem playing the guitar.) The third line of each verse is in Latin and simply translates as "Christ is born today".
Received lots of comments & props
2
453  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Leave Your Sheep The walking group of which I am a member, (The Manx Footpaths Conservation Group), hold a Carol Service each year at St Luke's Church in Baldwin in the middle of the Isle of Man. During the service this afternoon, I performed my own carol, "Leave Your Sheep", singing it in both English and Manx. The Manx translation was done for me by a friend, Fiona McArlde, and I learnt it phonetically as I regret that I do not speak Manx. Clive Walsh, one of my fellow walkers, kindly videoed the performance for me, so that I am able to share it here. Chords, lyrics and the phonetic version can be seen below: Leave Your Sheep (Faag-jee ny Kirree) A R Archibald G C G Shepherds come! Hear the song! Hark the herald angels sing: G C D7 G Leave your sheep! We will keep watch o’er them to – night. G C G Have no fear! We are here! Make your way to Bethlehem! G C D7 G Leave your sheep! We will keep watch o’er them to – night. C G D7 G There you’ll find a new-born child; Mary’s son so – o meek and mild C G D7 G In a manger gently laid; come to bring us joy. C G D7 G Wise men too will come to him, costly gifts to the babe they will bring. C G D7 G Join with them and praises sing: Peace be to all men! G C G Shepherds come! Hear the song! Hark the herald angels sing: G C D7 G Leave your sheep! We will keep watch o’er them to – night. G C G Have no fear! We are here! Make your way to Bethlehem! G C D7 G Leave your sheep! We will keep watch o’er them to – night. © 2015-11-28 Manx translation by Fiona McArdle (Phonetic pronunciation) Voch’llyn, tar-jee! Clasht-jee n’ arrane! Eaisht-jee rish n’ ainleyn chaghteraght Vock lin tar-jee! Clash-jee n’arrane! Aysh-jee rish nine lan chiackteragh Faag-jee ny kirree! Beemayd freayll arrey orroo noght. Feg-jee ny kirree! Bimad frail arra oroo nock Ny gow-jee aggle! Ta shin aynshoh. Immee-jee gys Bethlehem Ni gow-jee aal! Ta shin onshore. Immee-jee gus Bethlehem Faag-jee ny kirree! Beemayd freayll arrey orroo noght. Feg-jee ny kirree! Bimad frail arra oroo nock Yiowmayd shiu, oikan ruggit jiu, Mac Voirey, cho meiygh as meen, Yow mud shoe eekan ruggid jew Mac Vorra, _ho meark as meen, ‘Sy vanjoor marish e voir veen, eunys y chur dooin veih Niau. Su vanjoor morish e vor veen, eunice u cur doon vie Niow Hig deiney creeney lesh shilley er’n Vab cur lhieu gooityn da’n vabban meein, Hig daynya creena lesh shillya urn Varb cur lew gootin da’n vabban meein, Gow-jee moylley mâroo as arrane, Shee dy row er deiney as mraane. Gow-jee molla mareoo as arrane Shee du row er denya as mrain Voch’llyn, tar-jee! Clasht-jee n’ arrane! Eaisht-jee rish n’ ainleyn chaghteraght Vock lin tar-jee! Clash-jee n’arrane! Aysh-jee rish nine lan chiackteragh Faag-jee ny kirree! Beemayd freayll arrey orroo noght. Feg-jee ny kirree! Bimad frail arra oroo nock Ny gow-jee aggle! Ta shin aynshoh. Immee-jee gys Bethlehem Ni gow-jee aal! Ta shin onshore. Immee-jee gus Bethlehem Faag-jee ny kirree! Beemayd freayll arrey orroo noght. Feg-jee ny kirree! Bimad frail arra oroo nock Leave your sheep! We will keep watch o’er them to – night.
Received lots of comments & props
4
382  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: I Saw the Star Up High (Including lyrics and chords) This is a song introduced to me by my friend Peter Corkhill a few days ago. According to the internet site "GodSongs.net": This Advent / Christmas hymn was written by Scottish-educated, England-based Roman Catholic author and music publisher, Joan McCrimmon. ... The tune was composed in 1971 by the British-Kenyan folk singer Roger Whittaker (b 1936) and originally pared with the text "The Last Farewell.
1
426  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Christmas Island (Including lyrics and chords) Another request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, is a song written in 1946 by Lyle Moraine and first recorded by The Andrews Sisters and since recorded by many artists including Bob Dylan and most recently, Jimmy Buffett.
Received lots of comments & props
3
578  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: A Marshmallow World (Including lyrics and chords) A Marshmallow World is a song requested by my American friend Ken Shuttlesworth. According to Wikipedia: "A Marshmallow World" (sometimes called "It's a Marshmallow World") is a popular song that was written in 1949 by Carl Sigman (lyrics) and Peter DeRose (music). The song is about winter and is commonly regarded as a Christmas song, although the lyrics make no mention of the holiday. The song compares a snowfall to marshmallows covering the ground. It also describes the snowfall as whipped cream and the sun as a big red pumpkin head. The singer "waits for it the whole year 'round." The song was first a hit for Bing Crosby (backed by the Lee Gordon Singers and Sonny Burke and his Orchestra). Crosby's version was recorded in 1950.[1] It peaked at number 24 on the pop singles chart in January 1951.[2] Other artists who recorded the song in 1950 included Ray Anthony, Vic Damone, Johnny Desmond, Arthur Godfrey, Vaughn Monroe, Brenda Lee and Dean Martin.
2
425  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: See Amid the Winter's Snow (Including lyrics and chords) At this time of year, I like to upload seasonal songs. "See Amid the Winter's Snow" is one I particularly like, especially with the autoharp for accompaniment. According to Wikipedia: "See, amid the Winter's Snow", also known as "Hymn for Christmas Day" and "The Hymn for Christmas", is an English Christmas carol. It was written by Edward Caswall (1814–1878), with music composed by Sir John Goss (1800–1880). As "Hymn for Christmas Day", it featured in Christmas Carols New And Old, which was published in 1871 by Henry Ramsden Bramley (1833–1917) and John Stainer (1840–1901). There is a seventh verse to this hymn, but it is mostly omitted: Virgin Mother, Mary blest By the joys that fill thy breast, Pray for us, that we may prove Worthy of the Saviour's love.
2
600  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
2019 November walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly video diary of walks undertaken during the month of November, mainly in the company of members of the Manx Footpaths Conservation Group. As in October, November has been a month of very mixed weather this year. We have had some lovely fine days, some cloudy overcast days and some downright wet and miserable days, but none of the scheduled walks for Thursdays or Sundays were cancelled. The photographs shown in this video are but highlights from the walks. If you would like to see more of the photos from all my walks, go to https://photos.google.com/albums (Photographs with a family of mum dad and four children have been included with permission of the parents.) The musical tracks accompanying the video are: Candlelight Fisherman – Guitar The Bonny Bunch of Roses O – Guitar A Brisk Young Widow – Guitar Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out – Autoharp Sway – 12-string Guitar The Carrion Crow – 12-string Guitar Paddy McGinty’s Goat – Guitar The Old Dungarvan Oak – Autoharp La Bamba – Guitar Billy Bones Hornpipe – 12-string Guitar The Beggars’ Chorus – 12-string Guitar Arrane Ben-vlieaun - Autoharp
1
452  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/12-string guitar/autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Mary Mild (Including lyrics and chords) "Mary Mild" is a song I learned from listening to an LP from The Kingston Trio. It was written by Bob Shane; Tom Drake and Miriam Stafford, but was probably a re-working of an older song, "The Bitter Withy" and is a fictional story of an imagined incident in the life of Jesus Christ as a young boy. I have done this one some ten years ago with guitar accompaniment, but have decided to give it a go on the autoharp today. After many attempts, there are still a couple of "fluffs", but I have settled on this recording for publication. The chords shown in the annotations are suitable for a strumming accompaniment, but if you would like the chords for melody picking, send me your email address and I will share with you a PDF file of the score with lyrics and chords. nuncton@hotmail.com
Received lots of comments & props
1
433  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Way Me Susiana (Including lyrics and chords).
Received lots of comments & props
4
314  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: La Bamba (Including lyrics and chords) My upload is a piece of self-indulgence today. A couple of members of the autoharp community have recently posted videos playing La Bamba as an instrumental piece. I gave it a try on my own autoharp, but could not get the same sort of sound these others achieved, so decided to try to see if I could manage it on my guitar. This I think has worked better, though as I am not too skilled as an instrumentalist, I have not attempted to play the instrumental break that Ritchie Valens did in his original recording of the song. As well as being a challenge instrumentally, it has been a challenge linguistically as this is the first time I have attempted to sing a song in Spanish, never having learned the language at all, so please excuse my pronunciation if it is not quite correct. The riff is played as follows where "T" indicates my Thumb and "I" my Index finger, the number indicates which string is being plucked and the number in brackets indicates which fret is being used for that note: T5(3) T4(2) I3(0) T4(3) I3(2) I3(0) T6(3) T5(2) T4(0) T4(3) T4(3)T4(2) T4(0) REPEATED.
Received lots of comments & props
2
9,547  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: The Carrion Crow (Including lyrics and chords) Another song I have never heard before from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is "The Carrion Crow". The footnote on this song states: Source: Cecil Sharp's Collection of English Folk Songs, Vol 2, p 396, No 332, ed Maud Karpeles , Oxford University Press, 1974 Notes: Sung by Sister Emma (71) at Clewer, Berkshire, 27 February 1909. NB I have just spotted a small error in the annotations. The first chord in line 3 of the verse should have been D, not as I mistakenly transcribed, G. D The carrion crow sat upon an oak, A D Fol de rol de rol de ray, D A G A The carrion crow sat upon an oak, G A G A Watching a tailor mending his cloak. G A G A Heigh ho, the carrion crow! D A D Fol de rol de rol de ray.
2
382  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: The Valiant Lady (Including lyrics and chords) Also known as "The Brisk Young Lively Lad", my song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today is "The Valiant Lady" which, according to the footnote in the pamphlet, is a variant of a black-letter ballad "The Valiant Virgin, or Philip and Mary," etc., etc. "To the Tune of When the Stormy Winds do blow," [21 stanzas, Roxburge Coll., ii, 546]. In this longer ballad we learn that the lady is a rich gentleman's daughter, well versed in surgery and medicine, and her lover a poor farmer's son, both of Worcestershire. Also that, her father dying whilst Philip and Mary are still at sea, they return to her estate "to marry, to the admiration of all those that were at the wedding," as the title says. Mr. Baker forgot two lines of verse 6, and these have been restored from the old broadside. As with most of the songs I have found from the Singing Together pamphlets, the melody is presented in Joe Offer's transcriptions in Mudcat, but as they do not have chords with them, I have made up my own chord progression for my accompaniment.
Received lots of comments & props
1
595  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: The Candlelight Fisherman (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme "Singing Together" comes from the Spring 1985 pamphlet and is one I have never heard before. A footnote in the pamphlet reads: Peter Kennedy noted down this song from the Norfolk storyteller Phil Hamond of Morston, Norfolk in 1952. The words of the chorus are a recent addition by Peter and the words and the music were partly composed by Major Hamond, but the expression "Candlelight Fisherman" was once widely used to describe a lazy fisherman. The term is still used at Mevagissey in Cornwall. The aforementioned chorus is the second verse in my arrangement, but I felt that singing it as a chorus between each verse made the song too long and even more repetitive, so I only sang it as another verse. The chord progression I am using is of my own devising.
Received lots of comments & props
2
631  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: A Brisk Young Widow (Including lyrics and chords) "A Brisk Young Widow" is today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". The accompaniment and chord progression I have devised myself. The only information that came with the song is as follows: Source: Cyril Winn, A Selection of some less known Folk-Songs, Vol 2, Novello. Roud 2438: one example only is listed. This song was noted by Cecil Sharp from George Radford at Bridgwater Union, Somerset, 22nd August 1905. Mr Radford was 76 at the time. Winn probably quotes it from Sharp's Folk Songs of Somerset, no.3, Novello, 1906, where it was first published.
Received lots of comments & props
1
651  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Bonny Bunch of Roses O (Including lyrics and chords) "The Bonny Bunch of Roses O" is my song for today from the BBC programme "Singing Together". It has the following footnote in the pamphlet: Many people have been puzzled by the inconsistancies in the text of this song. James Reeves, in "The Everlasting Circle" (Heinemann 1960) mentions especially those in verse 4. These inconsistancies can, however, be very simply explained if it is borne in mind that the song is an imaginary conversation between Napoleon's young son and his mother, and that verse 4 is a continuance of his mother's warning and not, as is sometimes thought, a statement of unhistorical fact. When young Napoleon speaks of "The deeds of bold Napoleon" he is referring to the deeds of his father, not of himself. The Rev. Baring-Gould, in his notes to the song in "Songs of the West" states "it is unmistakably an anti-Jacobite production" later adapted as an anti-Napoleonic song. No proof has ever come to light to support this claim as far as we know and we, personally, doubt it very much. The tune to which the early Irish broadsides of the song are directed to be sung is "The Bonny Bunch of Rushes". The tune which Chas. Windebank sang is "The Rose tree in Full Bearing", (which is still in use as a Morris tune by the traditional Morris team at Bampton, Oxfordshire), and this is also of Irish origin. The high-flown language of some versions of the song would indicate that the song originated as an Irish broadside. It is certainly meant to be pro-Napoleonic; note especially the sting in the tail.
1
670  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Billy Bones' Hornpipe (Including lyrics and chords) From the 1964 pamphlet of the BBC programme "Singing Together", Billy Bone's Hornpipe is according to the footnotes: "traditional German; words by Alfred H Body". The song was quoted from Six Songs of Happiness, Set Two, Novello and Co. Ltd. Bibliographic details from the British Library are: Macmahon, Desmond: Six Songs of Happiness. Set 2. Being arrangements, for School use, of six European Folk-Songs by D. Macmahon. Translations and new words by A. H. Body. London : Novello and Co, 1938. I missed the following when I recorded this version, but there is another verse which should have been included as the second verse of the song: In the land of France they'd a how-d'ye-do, For old Billy Bones couldn't parlyvoo, (parlez vous) And the folk all stared at his sailor hat, And his pigtail tarred and his dancing cat. From the coast of France to Gay Paree The Frenchmen cried, "La, la! Oui, oui! Oh, he'll win the prize of a silver pound, If he'll dance the world around."
Received lots of comments & props
1
378  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: The Beggars' Chorus (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" has the following footnote in the pamphlet from which I found it: Songs celebrating beggars enjoyed a considerable vogue [in Tudor and Stuart times - DMG]. Richard Brome's play Jovial Crew; or, The Merry Beggars of 1641 had several such pieces. A later edition (of 1684) introduced what is perhaps the most famous of all beggar songs which also appeared as a street ballad. The tune and metre were taken up and widely used in other songs, and versions of "The Beggar's Chorus" remained in oral tradition until at least 1952. I had thought that I uploaded a song called "A-begging I Will Go" some years ago, but if I did, mysteriously, it has disappeared from my channel. It was one I knew from the singing of the Ian Campbell Folk Group and had virtually the same lyrics as many of the verses of this version, though the tune was not the same.
Received lots of comments & props
3
558  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: The American King (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme Singing Together today for my upload. "The American King" is a new one on me, but I felt that I recognized the tune. It is I think the same tune as a Manx "Arrane Ben-vlieaun" which translates as "The Milking Song" and is one I have played as the middle tune in a set of three on my mandolin.
Received lots of comments & props
3
479  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out (Including lyrics and chords) I uploaded a guitar accompanied version of this song a few weeks ago, but on a dark and dreary morning today, I decided to try it out on the autoharp as a response to Jan's challenge on the UK Autoharp FB page. I have used my Richwood 'harp, (which incidentally I bought off Jan), as it has the F#dim chord which my OS does not..Also the chord bar layout is easier for this one in this 'harp.
Received lots of comments & props
3
366  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
2019 October walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly video diary of walks undertaken during the month of October, mainly in the company of members of the Manx Footpaths Conservation Group, but at the beginning of the month, I led a group of visitors who were here for the “Walk the Isle of Man Festival”. October has been a month of very mixed weather this year. On 1st there was a day of torrential rain which caused a great deal of flooding which was particularly damaging in Laxey. As a consequence, our first walk of the month which had been scheduled for Laxey was cancelled. I also missed a Sunday walk a fortnight later again due to extremely heavy rain. All other walks went ahead however, and some of them were blessed with sunshine or at least were dry. The musical tracks accompanying the video are: Still Not Dead – 12-string Guitar The Mighty Atlantic – 12-string Guitar The Briar and The Rose – Guitar It’s Getting Better – 12-string Guitar Yellow Sheepskin – Guitar Always the Winner – 12-string Guitar Mother Maybelle – Autoharp Caledonia – 12-string Guitar Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out – Guitar The Strawberry Road – Guitar Running Gun – 12-string Guitar Utah Carol – 12-string Guitar Till the Rivers All Run Dry – Guitar Sunset – Autoharp – My own composition.
1
671  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar/guitar/autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: All The Little Chickens in The Garden (Including lyrics and chords) I am returning to songs from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today, this one. According to the footnotes on the pamphlet: Reported a number of times in English tradition, but more documented in the USA. It appears to derive from a song written by James A. Bland, The Farmer's Daughter, or, the Little Chickens in the Garden. Sheet music of 1883 can be seen at The Lester Levy Sheet Music Collection. There is also a parody version which I have only just spotted and which I will upload soon.
1
407  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Paddy McGinty's Goat (Including lyrics and chords) I uploaded a version of this song ten years ago, but as I have since found a version with two more verses, and as our theme at our sing-around at The Manor Hotel last night was "Animals", I decided to give it another go.
Received lots of comments & props
2
509  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Sway (Including lyrics and chords) "Sway" is a song that originates from Mexico and had the title "¿Quién será?". It is a bolero-mambo written by Mexican composer Luis Demetrio, who sold the rights to fellow songwriter Pablo Beltrán Ruiz. Beltrán recorded the song for the first time with his orchestra in 1953. Pedro Infante, for whom the song was written, recorded it in 1954. The English version, "Sway", with lyrics by Norman Gimbel, has become a standard in both the pop and jazz repertoire. The first version to achieve considerable success in the United States was recorded by singer Dean Martin with the Dick Stabile orchestra in 1954. For the benefit of no Spanish speakers, ¿Quién será? translates as Who will it be?
Received lots of comments & props
3
498  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: The Old Dungarvan Oak (Including lyrics and chords) Under the title "The Old Dungarvan Oak", this song became a number one hit in Ireland when released by Daniel O'Donnell. However, the song was originally called "The Old Carmarthen Oak" and was composed and written by Welshman, Frank Hennessy. I heard it sung acapella, by a friend, Kath Kelly at a concert here in the Isle of Man a couple of weeks ago and realised that I had not done this one, so have decided to give it a go accompanying myself on the autoharp.
Received lots of comments & props
2
669  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Headless Horseman (Including lyrics and chords) A suggestion from subscriber "Jack Carter" that I should have a go at this song for Halloween set me quite a challenge, especially as he thought my "deep voice", (his words) would sound just right for it like the performer whose voice is used in the Disney animated film of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. I listened to versions by Thurl Ravenscroft and Bing Crosby before attempting to do my own interpretation. Here in the Isle of Man, we celebrate Hop-tu-naa rather than Halloween. It is the celebration of the traditional Celtic festival of Samhain, the start of winter (Oie Houney). (The lenited form of the genitive singular of Samhain is Shamhna.) It is thought to be the oldest unbroken tradition in the Isle of Man.
Received lots of comments & props
4
935  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Still Not Dead (Including lyrics and chords) A couple of years ago, a local musician introduced a song he was about to sing stating it was "by the late, great Willie Nelson"!!! He had seen an announcement on the internet that Willie Nelson had passed away! Willie too saw this announcement and immediately wrote this song in response. Just like Willie, I woke up this morning, still not dead!!!
1
586  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: The Strawberry Roan (Including lyrics and chords) Another song from the repertoire of Marty Robbins, according to Wikipedia: "The Strawberry Roan" is a classic American cowboy song, written by California cowboy Curley Fletcher and first published in 1915, as a poem called The Outlaw Broncho. By the early 1930s, the song had become famous; in 1931 it was sung by a cowboy in the Broadway play Green Grow the Lilacs. It has become one of the best-known cowboy songs, found in dozens of collections of American folk music and performed on numerous recordings. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time. The song tells the story of a bragging horse breaker who meets his match in a picturesque strawberry roan.
Received lots of comments & props
4
793  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Utah Carol (Including lyrics and chords) This song is new to me, and when I saw its title my first thought was that it must be a Carol from the state of Utah. Of course, that is not the case as Utah Carol is the name of the protagonist in the song. The version I am singing is from Marty Robbins album, Gunfighter Ballads and is a slightly abridged version of the original traditional song "Utah Caroll's Last Ride" (Utah Carl). After uploading this song, I noticed that in a couple of places, I had made errors in singing the lyrics. The annotations on screen are the correct lyrics.
2
474  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Running Gun (Including lyrics and chords) The last song I uploaded, "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" was inspired by my friend John Ruscoe as is today's song, "Running Gun". Written by Tompall Glaser and Jim Glaser, and sung by Marty Robbins, "Running Gun" was the B-side to his great hit, "El Paso", which I recently uploaded using my autoharp for accompaniment: https://youtu.be/AI1AGVPwPTY
Received lots of comments & props
3
525  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out (Including lyrics and chords) "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" is a song written by Jimmy Cox in 1923. According to Wikipedia: When "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" was composed in 1923 by Jimmy Cox, the "Roaring Twenties" were coming into full swing. After the post-World War I recession, a new era of prosperity was experienced in the U.S. and elsewhere. However, in the face of all the optimism, Cox wrote a cautionary tale about the fickle nature of fortune and its attendant relationships. The song has been performed in various styles by many artists, notably Bessie Smith in the late 1920's and more recently, Eric Clapton. My friend John Ruscoe plays and sings this one very well with a similar guitar accompaniment to Clapton's, and he inspired me to have a go myself. I am nowhere as skilled on the guitar as John, but have made what I hope is a reasonable attempt at it. The lyrics I am singing are based on the Clapton version.
Received lots of comments & props
2
1,130  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Mother Maybelle (Including lyrics and chords) Another song for my friend Jan Brodie's October challenge on the UK Autoharp Facebook page for a song about a name. I don't think there is a more appropriate name associated with autoharps than Mother Maybelle, so here is my interpretation of the song which was performed by Marty Stuart and Johnny Cash.
Received lots of comments & props
1
587  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Yellow Sheepskin (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC "Singing Together" programme for today's upload. A Welsh folk song for which according to the BBC pamphlet: These lyrics were specially written by John Edwards. Melody taken from the score which Joe Offer has shown, but the chord progression is of my own devising.
Received lots of comments & props
2
618  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Caledonia (Including lyrics and chords) Dougie MacLean's song "Caledonia" is one I uploaded some years ago, but as it was done using inferior recording equipment, and I do not think I had the best chord progression for it at that time, I am uploading it again using my new 12-string guitar and a finger-style accompaniment.
1
657  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Always the Winner (Including lyrics and chords) Subscriber "Johnny Oldham" commenting on my recent upload of a "Runrig" song, "The Mighty Atlantic", suggested that I might check out their song "Always the Winner". I liked what I heard, so here is my own interpretation of the song, again using my new 12-string guitar for accompaniment. The chord progression is more or less one found on the site, "Ultimate Guitar", but as they don't give chords for the instrumental breaks between some of the verses, I have devised my own for those.
2
551  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: It's Getting Better (Including lyrics and chords) Written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil and performed by Cass Elliot of The Mamas and The Papas, "It's Getting Better" is the first song I have actually recorded using my recently bought second-hand 12-string guitar, (although not the first one I have uploaded using it.) Cass Elliott was known as "Mama Cass".
Received lots of comments & props
4
596  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
2019 September walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of so... read moreme of the walks taken during the month of September. The weather this month has been mostly fine, but on a couple of occasions, low cloud and light rain did mar walks to some extent. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: The Waters of Tyne – Guitar Things – Autoharp Tramping song – Guitar Old Bazaar in Cairo – Guitar Turpin Hero – Guitar Till Tomorrow Goes Away – Guitar The Spotted Cow – Guitar Queen of Connemara – Guitar The Trail of the Lonesome Pine – Guitar Oom Pah Pah – Guitar Pretty Mary – Autoharp The Unfortunate Tailor – Guitar Si Bheag Si Mhor – Autoharp If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
Received lots of comments & props
2
848  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
12-string Guitar: Mighty Atlantic (The) The Mighty Atlantic is a song from the repertoire of the Scottish folk band "Runrig". I am not sure who wrote the song, but assume it must have been one of the band members. It is some time since I uploaded a song accompanied by a 12-string guitar. The reason for this being that the neck of my old EKO collapsed again, and this time terminally. I bought a second-hand Epiphone last week and have been trying it out, this being the first video for which I have used it. Co-incidentally, the first 6-string guitar I bought about 45 years ago was an EKO and I got the 12-sting version second-hand shortly after buying that one. Now I have an Epiphone 6-string and lo-and-behold, I have bought a 12-string version of that second-hand.
Received lots of comments & props
1
614  
Anthony Archibald - 12-string guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Briar and the Rose (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Two fellow members of the UK Autoharp group posted a lovely duet of this song a couple of days ago which inspired me to learn it for myself. I felt, however, that it suited the guitar rather than my autoharp as there are chords not available to me on that instrument especially as in his original version, the author, Tom Waits, changes key after the first verse. Here then is my interpretation of the song "The Briar and the Rose".
Received lots of comments & props
1
629  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Oom Pah Pah (Including lyrics and chords) This song comes from the musical "Oliver" written and composed by Lionel Bart. My friend Sylvia likes to perform this one, and up to now I have attempted to busk along an accompaniment, but now I have found a fuller chord progression for it and am using it in this video.
Received lots of comments & props
1
772  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Old Bazaar in Cairo (Including lyrics and chords) At our last monthly meeting of the Manx Autoharpers, my friend Alan sang this song which we all found very amusing. I vaguely remember it from my youth, and decided to give it a go myself, but using the guitar for accompaniment rather than the autoharp. The song was written by Charlie Chester, K. Morris and Clinton Ford. (Incidentally, my brother was at college with Charlie Chester's son).
Received lots of comments & props
2
609  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Pretty Mary (Including lyrics and chords) Not sure if this is a request from a subscriber or if I came across it by some other means, but I decided to use my autoharp for accompaniment. (My memory is not as good as it was before it got as bad as it is now, so my apologies if it was a request, I cannot remember from whom it came.)
6
662  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Waters of Tyne (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" today is one I uploaded eleven years ago using my 12-string guitar for a strumming accompaniment. The recording equipment I used then was inferior and the microphone prone to crackling if the volume of my voice was too loud for it. Today, I am uploading the same song, "Waters of Tyne" using my 6-string in a finger-style accompaniment.
Received lots of comments & props
3
874  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Turpin Hero (Including lyrics and chords) Turpin Hero is another song from the BBC programme "Singing Together". I uploaded a version of this song ten years ago using my 12-string guitar for accompaniment. The equipment I was using at that time was a simple webcam, the microphone of which was prone to interference if I sang too loud, so I am uploading a new version today using my 6-string guitar. Dick Turpin was a notorious highwayman whose exploits were romanticized after he was hung for horse theft in York in 1739. Despite the title of this song, he was no hero.
2
651  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Things (Including lyrics and chords) The theme we have set for song performances at this month's meeting of the Manx Autoharpers Group is "Objects or Artifacts". An alternative title for this theme to me could be "Things", and that is the song I will be performing at tomorrow's meeting. It is a song written and recorded by Bobby Darin in 1962 and has been covered by many artists since including one of my favourite version by Dean Martin and Nancy Sinatra. Now that I have published the video, I have only just noticed that in the annotations, I missed the letter "e" from the end of the word "ride " in the choruses written without chords.
2
800  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Sweet Rose of Sharon (The) (Including lyrics and chords) For the UK Autoharp group on Facebook, Jan has set a theme of Flowers for this month's challenge, so I am submitting my own composition, "The Sweet Rose of Sharon" as my offering. I wrote this song for my flautist friend, Sharon Christian, and have previously performed it playing my guitar with her playing the instrumental break on her flute. Three years ago at the Scottish Autoharp Workshop Weekend in Moniaive in Scotland, Bob Ebdon was kind enough to accompany me on his autoharp while I played the song on my guitar. Yesterday, for the first time, I decided to try it out on my own autoharp, this being the result.
5
4,677  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Till Tomorrow Goes Away (Including lyrics and chords) Another request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth, is for a song I have not heard before by an artist I have not heard of. The song is "Till Tomorrow Goes Away" which has been written by Max Clarke who according to Wikipedia is known by his stage name Cut Worms, and is a singer, songwriter, and musician hailing from Ohio who is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. Cut Worms has opened for bands such as Jenny Lewis, Kevin Morby, The Lemon Twigs and Michael Rault. Cut Worms released the EP Alien Sunset in 2017. For my interpretation of the song, in the annotations, G* is played using only the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings and hammering on the 4th string behind the 2nd fret: T4(h), I, M, T4(h), T4(h), T4(h),
Received lots of comments & props
2
767  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Queen of Connemara (The) (Including lyrics and chords) "The Queen of Connemara" is a song requested by my America friend Ken Shuittlesworth. Written by Frank Fahy, it was one of the songs from the repertoire of the Irish folk duo, Clancy and Makem. Liam Clancy and Tommy Makem were two of the very successful group The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem who paired up after the other brothers retired, though they did get together from time to time for reunion tours in the mid 1980's. The Queen of Connemara in this case was not a person, but a boat. A "hooker" in this context is a fishing boat that caught fish using a long line with hooks unlike a "trawler" which caught fish in a large net.
2
739  
Anthony Archibald - 5-string banjo
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Unfortunate Tailor (The) (Including lyrics and chords) My song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" this morming comes with the following footnote information; Source: Kennedy, D (1987) Martin Carthy: A Guitar in Folk Music. Petersham, New Punchbowl Music Notes: A version of this song - with a significantly different verse order - is in the Gardiner collection, Gardiner H.456/H.935 and was collected from George Lovett, Winchester, Hants August 1906 and from Alfred Oliver, Basingstoke, Hants September 1907. As with most of the songs from this set of pamphlets, I have worked out my own chord progression for it.
3
1,088  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Tramping Song (Including lyrics and chords) According to the BBC pamphlet from the 1971 issue of the programme "Singing Together", this is an Irish Song: From "The Song Fair" published by J Curwen & Sons Ltd. It is a very appropriate song for me as with a group called the Manx Footpaths Conservation Group, I do a lot a walking and especially at this time of the year, the hills are covered with flowering gorse and heather and in places deep bracken. To get the quick chord changes for the last line of each verse, G, Am,, G, Am I do not play a full G chord, but simply leave all the strings open and hold the Am chord shape, dropping the fingers down for that chord and lifting them off for the G chord.
Received lots of comments & props
0
911  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: On Board of a Man-of-War (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is also known as "Susans's Adventures inf a Man-of-War". A footnote in the pamphlet reads: Frank Kidson, Traditional Tunes, 1891, pp. 102-3 (Reprinted Llanerch Press, 1999) Kidson noted: "This is another East Riding tune, which, with the words, is much thought of among the seafaring classes round about Hull. The incident of a girl going to sea disguised in sailor's attire during the last century's naval wars was really not an uncommon one; there are many such recorded. Considering the hard life and the tyranny to which the sailors of that period were subjected, it is a scarcely to be conceived impulse which would force a girl to such a proceeding. "In the present ballad the line- "She faced the walls of China, where her life was not insured "is a highly poetical flight on the part of the poet, and would be doubtlessly well appreciated by the audience it was intended for." As with most of the songs from this series, I have devised my own chord progression.
1
771  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
2019 August walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of August. The weather this month has been mixed, but we did not lose any walks despite there being low cloud, mist and rain on two occasions. I did however miss two walks when I was off the island attending an Autoharp Workshop Weekend in Moniaive in Scotland. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: Flanagan – Autoharp San Francisco Blues – Guitar Route 66 – Guitar Sacramento – Guitar If I Were a Blackbird – Guitar Spotted Cow – Guitar Whistle Daughter Whistle – Guitar Green Grow the Rashes O – Autoharp The Shepherd and His Dog – Guitar If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
1
756  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp/guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Spotted Cow (The) (Including lyrics and chords) I am often amazed by the risqué content of some of the songs that were published in the BBC schools' programme, "Singing Together". The Spotted Cow is one such, though there are more that are even more obvious in their sexual content. The footnotes in the pamphlet are as follows: Source: Purslow, F, (1968), The Wanton Seed, EDFS, London Notes: Frank Purslow wrote: Tune and text from Amos Ash of Combe Florey, Somerset. Hammond S.4. Another example of the idyllic rural (but town-made) song - by so many people still thought to be typical of folk-song, breathing the sweet unpolluted air of scented flowery dells, full of innocence and purity. All the same, I'm not sure that "the spotted cow," especially at the end of the song, is everything it appears to be. Chiefly found in tradition in England, where it persists to the present day, and widely printed on broadsides during the 19th century. Baring Gould (Songs of the West) states that "The earliest form of the words is found in a garland printed by Angus of Newcastle, B.M. (11,621,c.4)". Angus was active between around 1774 and 1825. As with all the songs from the "Singing Together" pamphlets, I have worked out my own chord progression for this one.
2
894  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Silly Old Man (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to the BBC programme, Singing Together, for my upload. The following comes from the footnote in the pamphlet: Source: Songs of the West by S. Baring-Gould. Notes: Abridged from S. Baring-Gould. A ballad that was sung by the late Rev. G. Luscombe something over half a century ago. He was curate at Bickleigh, and by ancestry belonged to a good old Devonshire family, he was paticularly fond of ancient West of England songs. Miss Mason in her 'Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs,' 1877, gives a slight variant. The ballad is in Dixon's 'Songs of the English Peasantry,' 1846, as taken down from him in Yorkshire in 1845. In Yorkshire the song goes by the name of 'Saddle to Rags'; there and elsewhere in Northern England, it is sung to the tune of 'The Rant,' better known as 'How happy I could be with either.' It has been published as a Scottish Ballad in Maidment's 'Ballads and Songs,' Edinburgh, 1859. It is given in Kidson's 'Traditional Tunes.' The words also are in 'A Pedlar's Pack,' by Logan, Edinburgh, 1849. The tune to which the ballad is sung in Devonshire is quite distinct. As with other songs from this series, I have worked out my own chord progression for the song. In the third line, there is a quick change from C to D which I have performed by simply sliding the C chord shape up two frets (indicated by a right pointing arrow) rather than changing to the normal open D position.
Received lots of comments & props
3
914  
Anthony Archibald - 5-string banjo
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: If I Were a Blackbird (Including lyrics and chords) Requested by subscriber Nima Pourkarimi, "If I Were a Blackbird" is an old song covered by many artists, the version I have based my performance on being "Silly Wizard". Although the title of the song is more grammatically correct, the same line in the chorus is sung as: "If I was a blackbird". The song is new to me, so this is the first time I have sung it and as yet have not done so in front of an audience.
Received lots of comments & props
2
932  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Hal-An-Tow (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am catching up with songs that have been requested by subscribers. Ha-An-Tow is one such, requested by Johnny Oldham. It is a Cornish traditional song, performed on 8th May in Helston, Cornwall, in a pageant celebrating the end of Winter and start of Summer. The song contains disparaging references to the Spaniards, probably referring to the Spanish raid on Newlyn in 1595. There are probably many more verses, but I have based my own interpretation on a version recorded by The Watersons, and have worked out my own chord progression for it. Although my maternal great-grandparents came to the Isle of Man from Cornwall, I have never visited that county, and this song is new to me.
Received lots of comments & props
3
1,158  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Spider in the Bath (Including lyrics and chords) At the monthly meeting of the Manx Autoharpers last week, we had a theme of "insects and/or creepy-crawlies". I chose this one which I have done previously using my guitar for accompaniment. On the morning on which I recorded this autoharp version, there was in fact a spider in my bath, so I took a couple of photos of it before helping it out and releasing it. There is a BBC children's television series by this name which has its own theme song, but this is not it. This one is a song written by Marcus Turner from New Zealand.
Received lots of comments & props
2
890  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Shuttle Rins (The) (Including lyrics and chords) My song from BBC programme "Singing Together" today is simply identified as "Scotland" in the pamphlet. In an article under the title "Discussion" in Mudcat, Malcolm Douglas wrote: The song is originally from Henry Symes's book Poems and Songs Chiefly for the Encouragement of the Working Classes (1849). The Shuttle Rins appeared in Norman Buchan and Peter Hall, The Scottish Folksinger (1973) and has subsequently been recorded by various people, including Gordeanna McCulloch. The tune is one of those associated with the older song The Boatie Rows. Whether that tune was intended for it by Symes, or whether it was added by Buchan and Hall, I don't know. The dialect of the Buchan-Hall text is rather ironed out in Singing Together, and lacks several verses. See Mudcat thread Lyr Req: the shuttle runs Not really a traditional song (though perhaps assumed to be by 1984), so not listed in Roud. It being a Scottish song, I have pronounced "bread" as "bried". A pirn is a rod onto which weft thread is wound for use in weaving. A "sark" is a shirt.
Received lots of comments & props
2
3,065  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Shepherd and his Dog (The) (Including lyrics and chords) The footnote in the BBC pamphlet of the Singing Together programme from Spring 1959 has the following about the song: Welsh Traditional Tune 'Twll Bach y Clo' Words by Barbara Kluge This tune is very widespread and is probably best known - outside Wales! - for the Australian song "Click go the Shears", a song I uploaded nine years ago: https://youtu.be/LvAZGGFtu6k The pamphlet attributes the melody as a Welsh traditional tune, but Wikipedia claims it is an American Civil War song, "Ring the Bell, Watchman", by Henry Clay Work, author of "My Grandfather's Clock". Another song that uses this tune is "Strike the Bell" which I also uploaded using my mandolin for accompaniment: https://youtu.be/f8OXNc_Mw_E
Received lots of comments & props
3
933  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
The Seeds of Love (Including lyrics and chords) Today's upload from the BBC programme "Singining Together" comes from the Cecil Sharp collection and according to the footnote in the pamphlet, had an interesting history; Noted by Cecil Sharp from John England of Hambridge, Somerset, in 1903. Although this is not an uncommon song and is available in many other places, it represents a seminal event in the first Folk Song Revival; Cecil Sharp's introduction to folksong "in the wild". Sharp was staying with the vicar of Hambridge, Charles Marson, an old friend from their days in Australia. Maud Karpeles (Cecil Sharp: His Life and Work, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1967) tells the story thus: "Cecil Sharp was sitting in the vicarage garden talking to Charles Marson and to Mattie Kay, who was likewise staying at Hambridge, when he heard John England quietly singing to himself as he mowed the vicarage lawn. Cecil Sharp whipped out his notebook and took down the tune; and then persuaded John to give him the words. He immediately harmonised the song; and that same evening it was sung at a choir supper by Mattie Kay, Cecil Sharp accompanying. The audience was delighted; as one said, it was the first time that the song had been put into evening dress." The song has been widespread in England in various forms and under many different names, also turning up in the USA and Scotland. William Chappell (Popular Music of the Olden Time, 1859), names it, along with Cupid's Garden and Early One Morning, as "one of the three most popular songs among the servant-maids of the present generation", and mentions its appearance on the London stage, sung by Mrs. Honey, in a play entitled The Loan of a Lover. He also quotes a passage from Whittaker's History of the Parish of Whalley (1801) which ascribes the lyric to a Mrs. Fleetwood Habergham, of Habergham Hall, Lancashire, who is supposed to have written the song to console herself when, in 1689, her husband's extravagances finally led to the loss of the family's estates. This apocryphal story is not generally taken too seriously nowadays. I noticed that when I recorded the song, I made a couple of slight errors in the lyrics. The annotations give the correct version.
2
1,521  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Whistle Daughter Whistle (Including lyrics and chords) "Whistle Daughter Whistle" is an old folk song that appears on an album called " Folk Songs of Courting and Complaint " performed by Peggy Seeger. I was not aware of this song until last weekend when my friend Beastie Dovey sang it at a jam session in the Craigdarragh Hotel in Moniaive where we were attending an autoharp workshop weekend. Beastie cannot whistle, so she asked me to help her by doing the whistle for her. Unable to find the chords on the internet, I have devised my own which I think fit the song well enough.
Received lots of comments & props
4
1,000  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Sacramento (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme "Singing Together" is a sea shanty with the title "Sacramento". According to the footnote in the pamphlet: The song dates from the year 1849 when gold was discovered in Sacramento, California. The men who took part in this rush were called 'forty-niners', an expression which occurs in another folk song of this period, Clementine. In common with other sea shanties, the song would have been led by a "shantyman" with his crewmates singing the repeated line "Sacramento, Sacramento" and probably the whole of the chorus. This is only a short song, but no doubt could be lengthened by the "Shantyman" when necessary. As with all the tunes in the programme, the sheet music is available, but does not give the chords which I have worked out for myself.
2
926  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Sad Song Palace Grand (Including lyrics and chords) Today, I am returning to the BBC programme "Singing Together" for my upload. As it happens, I saw a thread on Mudcat yesterday regarding this very song. The BBC pamphlet has the following about it: Source: Randolph, V, 1982. Ozark Folksongs, Illinois Press, Urbana Notes: Collected by Vance Randolph from May Kennedy McCord, Springfield, Mo., May 14, 1934, who learnt it near Galena, Mo., about 1900. Randolph wrote that "this piece has no local title but Carl Sandburg, who heard it at Springfield Mo., in 1930, always called it 'The Sad Song'" Norm Cohen wrote: The origins of this song have not been traced, but it would appear to be a sheet-music composition of the 1880s or 1890s. Evelyn Beers learned it from May Kennedy McCord and has sung it frequently; her version is in Bush (1970). Joan Baez also recorded the piece; she learned it from Randolph's text. When Randolph recorded Mrs McCord singing this in 1941, (AFS 5297 B3), she titled it "Lady Mary". Max Hunter, who also recorded her rendition of the song (MFH 549), used the title by which his mother had sung it - "Palace Grand." I may be wrong, but the melody sounds to me to be very much like "South Wind".
Received lots of comments & props
1
1,967  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: San Francisco Bay Blues (Including lyrics and chords) San Francisco Bay Blues was written/composed by Jesse Fuller, an American "one-man-band" musician, the song being recorded in 1954 and released a year later on a small label called "World Song". It soon became a classic with covers recorded by such artistst as: The Blues Band, Paul Jones, Jim Croce, The Weavers, Sammy Walker, The Brothers Four, Paul Clayton, Richie Havens, Eric Clapton, The Flatlanders, Paul McCartney, Hot Tuna, Janis Joplin, John Lennon, Peter, Paul, and Mary, Mungo Jerry, Glenn Yarbrough, George Ellias, Phoebe Snow, The Wave Pictures, The Halifax III and Eva Cassidy according to Wikipedia. I have never sung it before, largely because I hadn't the courage nor ability to play it on the guitar. Today, I thought I would try it using a kazoo for an instrumental break which Fuller himself used to do and experimenting on how to get the step down from C through B and Bb to A which I have done by barring the strings at the 5th fret (relative to the capo) then sliding down one fret at a time to the second fret. It seemed to work well enough for me I think. I got a little bit tongue-tied at the end, but wasn't going to try to re-record the whole song, so have left it as is. I also speeded up throughout the song, as I am prone to do, even though I set out with good intention of trying to keep the tempo slow.
Received lots of comments & props
2
1,268  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/kazoo
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Route 66 (Including lyrics and chords) My Canadian friend Steve Lacey did a version of this song which he posted on Facebook a couple of weeks go and as I have never sung it before, I decided I would have a go. Here then is my interpretation of "Route 66" described on Wikipedia as follows: "(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66" is a popular rhythm and blues standard, composed in 1946 by American songwriter Bobby Troup. The song uses a twelve-bar blues arrangement and the lyrics follow the path of U.S. Route 66 (US 66), which traversed the western two-thirds of the U.S. from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California. Nat King Cole, with the King Cole Trio, first recorded the song the same year and it became a hit, appearing on Billboard magazine's R&B and pop charts. Another version to reach the Billboard charts was that recorded by Bing Crosby with the Andrews Sisters on May 11, 1946 and this reached the No. 14 position in 1946. The song was subsequently recorded by many artists including Chuck Berry, Glenn Frey, the Rolling Stones, Them, Dr. Feelgood, Asleep at the Wheel, the Manhattan Transfer, Depeche Mode, The Brian Setzer Orchestra, Pappo, The Cramps, John Mayer,, George Benson and Peter Tork & Shoe Suede Blues. I will be away from my computer for five days, so I will not be uploading any more songs until Tuesday of next week.
Received lots of comments & props
2
824  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Green Grow the Rashes O (Including lyrics and chords) The widow of my good friend Ian Blacklaw Richardson (Max to his friends) requested that I sing this one which Ian used to sing often. I did a twelve-string gutiar accompanied version some time ago, but thought it might sound quite good on the autoharp, so for Elizabeth here is "Green Grow the Rashes O" (There is another song called "Green Grow the Rushes-Oh" which I have also sung, but that one is an English song and should not be confused with this one written by Robert Burns in 1783 and published in Poems in 1787. Later in 1787 it was published with music in The Scots Musical Museum, the first of Burns' poems to be set to music.)
Received lots of comments & props
2
1,142  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
2019 July walks in the Isle of Man This is my monthly diary of photographs of highlights of some of the walks taken during the month of July. The weather this month has been fine for the most part, but we did lose one walk at the very end due to heavy rain and strong winds. As usual, to accompany the photos I have added audio tracks from some of the videos I have uploaded this month. They are: With My Little Stick of Blackpool Rock – Guitar Flowers in the Valley – Guitar The Mass Rock in the Glen – Guitar Oats and Beans and Barley Grow – Guitar My Master’s Call – Guitar Green Eyes – Guitar Daisy Bell – Autoharp The Rout it has come for the Blues – Guitar Sweet Marie (Original) – Guitar Green Door – Autoharp The Road to the Isles – Guitar We Got Paid by Cash – Guitar Frankie and Johnny – Guitar (Open G tuning) If you would like to see more photos taken on these walks, visit the Facebook site “Isle of Man walks”, or my own Google photographs page which you should find at: https://photos.google.com/albums
2
2,064  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar/autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Flanagan (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge for this month on the UK Autoharp Facebook page is Sun, Sea and Holidays, so I thought this one fits well with "Holidays". It is a song that has personal connections for me. Florrie Forde, (real name Flora May Augusta Flannagan) who made this song famous, entertained here in the Isle of Man for over thirty years at the beginning of the last century. She was staying at a hotel in Douglas where she befriended my maternal grandparents and acted as one of my mum's godmothers.
3
840  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Frankie and Johnny (Including lyrics and chords) A bit of self-indulgence today. I have uploaded a version of this song previously using normal tuning EADGBE. I also uploaded another song, Frankie and Albert, which is an earlier version of the same story which I did using open G tuning DGDGBD. I have chosen to do this one in open G tuning, but am playing the accompaniment in a different way to that which I used for Frankie and Albert, and just getting in the flow. The chords shown in the annotations are chords for strumming an accompniment.
Received lots of comments & props
3
827  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Sweet Marie (Original) (Including lyrics and chords) The original song "Sweet Marie" was written by Philip Parris Lynott and William Scott Gorham. I uploaded Percy French's parody on this song a couple of days ago, not at that time knowing the original song. I have since found the orginal song's lyrics and present the song here. I found the lyrics on a site called "Lyrics.com", but although there are videos on YouTube of him playing the song, they are only instrumentals done in a "bluegrass" style. I did find an old scratchy 78 version by Ada Jones, but it was too indistinct to hear it properly. Irene Dunn and William Powell sang a few lines of the song in the film "Life with Father". Here then is my interpretation of the song for which once again, I have made up my own chord progression.
Received lots of comments & props
1
946  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Sweet Marie (Including lyrics and chords) "Sweet Marie" is a request from my American friend, Ken Shuttlesworth. It is a parody written by that prolific Irish songwriter Percy French on a love song of the same name. Some of French's lyrics paraphrase the original ones. Hank Snow recorded a version of the original song and I will have a go at that one soon.
2
718  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Rout it is come for the Blues (The) (Including lyrics and chords) Today's song from the BBC programme Singing Together is "The Rout it is come for the Blues". As the footnote in the pamphlet says: The title illustrates an interesting example of two English words which now have the same spelling but completely different meanings and origins. Rout meaning disorganised flight etc, comes from Middle English from Old French route. Rout as in this song, meaning muster, or fetch out of hiding, derives from root from O.E. "rµt." The chords I have worked out for myself.
Received lots of comments & props
4
1,165  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: Road to the Isles (Including lyrics and chords) My song today from the BBC programme Singing Together is Road to the Isles. The footnote in the pamphlet from Spring 1975 gives the following informatino about the song: The song was written Kenneth MacLeod. It appeared in his book The Road to the Isles (Edinburgh: Grant & Murray, 1927), with the comment "Written for the lads in France during the Great War." The poem was set by Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser, and was first printed (perhaps worded slightly differently) in Songs of the Hebrides vol II, 1917. According to The Fiddler's Companion, the tune was written as "The Burning Sands of Egypt by John McClellan, D.C.M., a poet and painter from Dunoon, Scotland, who was Pipe Major of the 8th Battalion, Argyl and Sutherland Highlanders, during World War I." Somewhere along the way it apparently also picked up the name The Bens of Jura along with the title it acquired from MacLeod's poem. The Far Coolins (Cuillins) are the mountains of Skye.
Received lots of comments & props
1
1,096  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Guitar: The Old Turf Fire (Including lyrics and chords) Back to the BBC programme "Singing Together" today for a short Irish song about which the footnote in the pamphlet of Spring 1976 read: Roud 8215, one example only at present: Hughes, Irish Country Songs 4, 1936, 41-44. Probably the original source of this text, though the song was recorded by John McCormack and other lyric tenors and was no doubt published as sheet music on the strength of that. The following comes from a site called Mainly Norfolk: English and Other Good Music: Steeleye Span recorded this song for their album Horkstow Grange. It was later included in the Park Records sampler A Stroll Through the Park. Gay Woods commented in the original album's sleeve notes: I used to hear this song when I was a child. “The hearth swept clean” - domestic bliss, my mother's pride and joy. I live near the boglands in the midlands of Ireland now and burn the stuff. There is a spirit and an art in the burning and storing of turf that warms and inspired: “Confounds all reckoning by sun Or star as turf-smoke drifts, Blue bitterness at dusk, and cabins Kneel in clusters to the dark.” (Norman Dugdale, an Englishman who lived in Ireland for nearly 50 years) The chords I am using for accompaniment are of my own devising.
2
1,336  
Anthony Archibald - Guitar
Video
Im9 6be
Autoharp: Green Door (Including lyrics and chords) Jan's challenge on UK Autoharps for July was "colours". I have uploaded this song accompanied on my guitar, but decided to give it a go on the autoharp for this challenge. Only four chords needed which for me are: F; F7; Bb; and C7. "Green Door" was written by Bob “Hutch” Davie and Marvin Moore. It was recorded by Jim Lowe in 1956 in USA, and by Frankie Vaughan in the UK and re-recorded by Shakin’ Stevens in 1981. I have based my interpretation on the Frankie Vaughan version which is the first one I remember hearing back in the days of "steam radio", or "wireless". :-)
1
779  
Anthony Archibald - Autoharp
Video
Im9 6be
Followers 634   
Views 8,875,868   
Props 17,615
Location Im9 6be
Share
Loading comments...